The Volume-Outcome Relationship in Retroperitoneal Soft Tissue Sarcoma: Evidence of Improved Short- and Long-Term Outcomes at High-Volume Institutions

Sanjay P. Bagaria, Matthew Neville, Richard J. Gray, Emmanuel Gabriel, Jonathan B. Ashman, Steven Attia, Nabil Wasif

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Background. We sought to study the association between RPS case volume and outcomes. Although a relationship has been demonstrated between case volume and patient outcomes in some cancers, such a relationship has not been established for retroperitoneal sarcomas (RPSs). Study Design. The National Cancer Database (NCDB) was queried for patients undergoing treatment for primary RPS diagnosed between 2004 and 2013. Mean annual patient volume for RPS resection was calculated for all hospitals and divided into low volume (<5 cases/year), medium volume (5-10 cases/year), and high volume (>10 cases/year). Risk-adjusted regression analyses were performed to identify predictors of 30-day surgical mortality, R0 margin status, and overall survival (OS). Results. Our study population consisted of 5,407 patients with a median age of 61 years, of whom 47% were male and 3,803 (70%) underwent surgical resection. Absolute 30-day surgical mortality and R0 margin rate following surgery for low-, medium-, and high-volume institutions were 2.4%, 1.3%, and 0.5% (p=0.027) and 68%, 65%, and 82%, (p<0.001), respectively. Five-year overall survival rates for low, medium, and high-volume institutions were 56%, 57%, and 66%, respectively (p<0.001). Patients treated at low-volume institutions had a significantly higher risk of 30-day mortality (adjusted OR = 4.66, 95% CI 2.26-9.63) and long-term mortality (adjusted HR = 1.56, 95% CI 1.16-2.11) compared to high-volume institutions. Conclusion. We demonstrate the existence of a hospital sarcoma service line volume-oncologic outcome relationship for RPS at the national level and provide benchmark data for cancer care delivery systems and policy makers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number3056562
JournalSarcoma
Volume2018
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

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Sarcoma
Mortality
Benchmarking
Neoplasms
Administrative Personnel
Survival Rate
Regression Analysis
Databases
Survival
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

The Volume-Outcome Relationship in Retroperitoneal Soft Tissue Sarcoma : Evidence of Improved Short- and Long-Term Outcomes at High-Volume Institutions. / Bagaria, Sanjay P.; Neville, Matthew; Gray, Richard J.; Gabriel, Emmanuel; Ashman, Jonathan B.; Attia, Steven; Wasif, Nabil.

In: Sarcoma, Vol. 2018, 3056562, 01.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bagaria, Sanjay P. ; Neville, Matthew ; Gray, Richard J. ; Gabriel, Emmanuel ; Ashman, Jonathan B. ; Attia, Steven ; Wasif, Nabil. / The Volume-Outcome Relationship in Retroperitoneal Soft Tissue Sarcoma : Evidence of Improved Short- and Long-Term Outcomes at High-Volume Institutions. In: Sarcoma. 2018 ; Vol. 2018.
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abstract = "Background. We sought to study the association between RPS case volume and outcomes. Although a relationship has been demonstrated between case volume and patient outcomes in some cancers, such a relationship has not been established for retroperitoneal sarcomas (RPSs). Study Design. The National Cancer Database (NCDB) was queried for patients undergoing treatment for primary RPS diagnosed between 2004 and 2013. Mean annual patient volume for RPS resection was calculated for all hospitals and divided into low volume (<5 cases/year), medium volume (5-10 cases/year), and high volume (>10 cases/year). Risk-adjusted regression analyses were performed to identify predictors of 30-day surgical mortality, R0 margin status, and overall survival (OS). Results. Our study population consisted of 5,407 patients with a median age of 61 years, of whom 47{\%} were male and 3,803 (70{\%}) underwent surgical resection. Absolute 30-day surgical mortality and R0 margin rate following surgery for low-, medium-, and high-volume institutions were 2.4{\%}, 1.3{\%}, and 0.5{\%} (p=0.027) and 68{\%}, 65{\%}, and 82{\%}, (p<0.001), respectively. Five-year overall survival rates for low, medium, and high-volume institutions were 56{\%}, 57{\%}, and 66{\%}, respectively (p<0.001). Patients treated at low-volume institutions had a significantly higher risk of 30-day mortality (adjusted OR = 4.66, 95{\%} CI 2.26-9.63) and long-term mortality (adjusted HR = 1.56, 95{\%} CI 1.16-2.11) compared to high-volume institutions. Conclusion. We demonstrate the existence of a hospital sarcoma service line volume-oncologic outcome relationship for RPS at the national level and provide benchmark data for cancer care delivery systems and policy makers.",
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T2 - Evidence of Improved Short- and Long-Term Outcomes at High-Volume Institutions

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AU - Neville, Matthew

AU - Gray, Richard J.

AU - Gabriel, Emmanuel

AU - Ashman, Jonathan B.

AU - Attia, Steven

AU - Wasif, Nabil

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N2 - Background. We sought to study the association between RPS case volume and outcomes. Although a relationship has been demonstrated between case volume and patient outcomes in some cancers, such a relationship has not been established for retroperitoneal sarcomas (RPSs). Study Design. The National Cancer Database (NCDB) was queried for patients undergoing treatment for primary RPS diagnosed between 2004 and 2013. Mean annual patient volume for RPS resection was calculated for all hospitals and divided into low volume (<5 cases/year), medium volume (5-10 cases/year), and high volume (>10 cases/year). Risk-adjusted regression analyses were performed to identify predictors of 30-day surgical mortality, R0 margin status, and overall survival (OS). Results. Our study population consisted of 5,407 patients with a median age of 61 years, of whom 47% were male and 3,803 (70%) underwent surgical resection. Absolute 30-day surgical mortality and R0 margin rate following surgery for low-, medium-, and high-volume institutions were 2.4%, 1.3%, and 0.5% (p=0.027) and 68%, 65%, and 82%, (p<0.001), respectively. Five-year overall survival rates for low, medium, and high-volume institutions were 56%, 57%, and 66%, respectively (p<0.001). Patients treated at low-volume institutions had a significantly higher risk of 30-day mortality (adjusted OR = 4.66, 95% CI 2.26-9.63) and long-term mortality (adjusted HR = 1.56, 95% CI 1.16-2.11) compared to high-volume institutions. Conclusion. We demonstrate the existence of a hospital sarcoma service line volume-oncologic outcome relationship for RPS at the national level and provide benchmark data for cancer care delivery systems and policy makers.

AB - Background. We sought to study the association between RPS case volume and outcomes. Although a relationship has been demonstrated between case volume and patient outcomes in some cancers, such a relationship has not been established for retroperitoneal sarcomas (RPSs). Study Design. The National Cancer Database (NCDB) was queried for patients undergoing treatment for primary RPS diagnosed between 2004 and 2013. Mean annual patient volume for RPS resection was calculated for all hospitals and divided into low volume (<5 cases/year), medium volume (5-10 cases/year), and high volume (>10 cases/year). Risk-adjusted regression analyses were performed to identify predictors of 30-day surgical mortality, R0 margin status, and overall survival (OS). Results. Our study population consisted of 5,407 patients with a median age of 61 years, of whom 47% were male and 3,803 (70%) underwent surgical resection. Absolute 30-day surgical mortality and R0 margin rate following surgery for low-, medium-, and high-volume institutions were 2.4%, 1.3%, and 0.5% (p=0.027) and 68%, 65%, and 82%, (p<0.001), respectively. Five-year overall survival rates for low, medium, and high-volume institutions were 56%, 57%, and 66%, respectively (p<0.001). Patients treated at low-volume institutions had a significantly higher risk of 30-day mortality (adjusted OR = 4.66, 95% CI 2.26-9.63) and long-term mortality (adjusted HR = 1.56, 95% CI 1.16-2.11) compared to high-volume institutions. Conclusion. We demonstrate the existence of a hospital sarcoma service line volume-oncologic outcome relationship for RPS at the national level and provide benchmark data for cancer care delivery systems and policy makers.

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