The ventilatory muscles. Fatigue, endurance and training

M. J. Belman, Gary C Sieck

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This review has dealt with the different methods used to evaluate ventilatory muscle function and the effects of training on the ventilatory muscles. In general, improved ventilatory muscle endurance can be attained by resistive or hyperpneic training. In patients with lung disease, this training confers benefits with respect to exercise capacity, although it does not appear to be essential for improved exercise performance. Whether or not this training should receive widespread use is still unclear in view of the fact that exercise alone achieves similar benefits. The analysis of the diaphragmatic EMG is being refined and may in the future become a useful clinical tool for the assessment of diaphragmatic function.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)761-766
Number of pages6
JournalChest
Volume82
Issue number6
StatePublished - 1982
Externally publishedYes

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Respiratory Muscles
Fatigue
Exercise
Lung Diseases

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

Belman, M. J., & Sieck, G. C. (1982). The ventilatory muscles. Fatigue, endurance and training. Chest, 82(6), 761-766.

The ventilatory muscles. Fatigue, endurance and training. / Belman, M. J.; Sieck, Gary C.

In: Chest, Vol. 82, No. 6, 1982, p. 761-766.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Belman, MJ & Sieck, GC 1982, 'The ventilatory muscles. Fatigue, endurance and training', Chest, vol. 82, no. 6, pp. 761-766.
Belman MJ, Sieck GC. The ventilatory muscles. Fatigue, endurance and training. Chest. 1982;82(6):761-766.
Belman, M. J. ; Sieck, Gary C. / The ventilatory muscles. Fatigue, endurance and training. In: Chest. 1982 ; Vol. 82, No. 6. pp. 761-766.
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