The use of cryopreserved aortoiliac allograft for aortic reconstruction in the United States

Michael P. Harlander-Locke, Liv K. Harmon, Peter F. Lawrence, Gustavo S. Oderich, Robert A. McCready, Mark D. Morasch, Robert J. Feezor

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59 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background Aortic infections, even with treatment, have a high mortality and risk of recurrent infection and limb loss. Cryopreserved aortoiliac allograft (CAA) has been proposed for aortic reconstruction to improve outcomes in this high-risk population. Methods A multicenter study using a standardized database was performed at 14 of the 20 highest volume institutions that used CAA for aortic reconstruction in the setting of infection or those at high risk for prosthetic graft infection. Results Two hundred twenty patients (mean age, 65; male:female, 1.6/1) were treated since 2002 for culture positive aortic graft infection (60%), culture negative aortic graft infection (16%), enteric fistula/erosion (15%), infected pseudoaneurysm adjacent to the aortic graft (4%), and other (4%). Intraop cultures indicated infection in 66%. Distal anastomosis was to the femoral artery and iliac. Mean hospital length of stay was 24 days, and 30-day mortality was 9%. Complications occurred in 24% and included persistent sepsis (n = 17), CAA thrombosis (n = 9), CAA rupture (n = 8), recurrent CAA/aortic infection (n = 8), CAA pseudoaneurysm (n = 6), recurrence of aortoenteric fistula (n = 4), and compartment syndrome (n = 1). Patients with full graft excision had significantly better outcomes. Ten (5%) patients required allograft explant. Mean follow-up was 30 ± 3 months. Freedom from graft-related complications, graft explant, and limb loss was 80%, 88%, and 97%, respectively, at 5 years. Primary graft patency was 97% at 5 years, and patient survival was 75% at 1 year and 51% at 5 years. Conclusions This largest study of CAA indicates that CAA allows aortic reconstruction in the setting of infection or those at high risk for infection with lower early and long-term morbidity and mortality than other previously reported treatment options. Repair with CAA is associated with low rates of aneurysm formation, recurrent infection, aortic blowout, and limb loss. We believe that CAA should be considered a first line treatment of aortic infections.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)669-674.e1
JournalJournal of vascular surgery
Volume59
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2014

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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    Harlander-Locke, M. P., Harmon, L. K., Lawrence, P. F., Oderich, G. S., McCready, R. A., Morasch, M. D., & Feezor, R. J. (2014). The use of cryopreserved aortoiliac allograft for aortic reconstruction in the United States. Journal of vascular surgery, 59(3), 669-674.e1. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jvs.2013.09.009