The static rotator cuff does not affect inferior translation of the humerus at the glenohumeral joint

Eiji Itoi, Neil E. Motzkin, Bernard F. Morrey, Kai Nan An

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The static contribution of the rotator cuff to the inferior stability of the shoulder is poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of static rotator cuff muscles on the inferior stability of the glenohumeral joint. Methods: The humeral head positions relative to the glenoid were obtained in 12 shoulder specimens under the following conditions: with and without a 1.5-kg load; with the humerus abducted and abducted 90 degrees; and in three stages of dissection: (1) before release of any of the rotator cuff muscles, (2) after release of the supraspinatus or the cuff muscles other than the supraspinatus, and (3) after release of all of the cuff muscles. The order of release was changed in two ways: release of the supraspinatus followed by the release of other muscles in one group, and the opposite order in the other group. Results: In both adduction and abduction, there were no significant differences in the positions of the humeral head either among the three stages of release or between the two different orders of release. Conclusion: The static contribution of the cuff muscles to the inferior stability of the shoulder is insignificant.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)55-59
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Trauma - Injury, Infection and Critical Care
Volume47
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1999

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Shoulder Joint
Rotator Cuff
Humerus
Muscles
Humeral Head
Dissection

Keywords

  • Biomechanics
  • Glenohumeral joint
  • Rotator cuff
  • Shoulder
  • Stability

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

The static rotator cuff does not affect inferior translation of the humerus at the glenohumeral joint. / Itoi, Eiji; Motzkin, Neil E.; Morrey, Bernard F.; An, Kai Nan.

In: Journal of Trauma - Injury, Infection and Critical Care, Vol. 47, No. 1, 07.1999, p. 55-59.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Itoi, Eiji ; Motzkin, Neil E. ; Morrey, Bernard F. ; An, Kai Nan. / The static rotator cuff does not affect inferior translation of the humerus at the glenohumeral joint. In: Journal of Trauma - Injury, Infection and Critical Care. 1999 ; Vol. 47, No. 1. pp. 55-59.
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