The second Canadian conference on multiple sclerosis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The epidemiology of multiple sclerosis (MS) and the planning and interpretation of clinical therapeutic trials were the subjects of a symposium on MS held on June 13, 1989. Several speakers addressed whether MS is a genetic or an environmental disease. An environmental trigger would resolve the relatively low penetrance of the disease in susceptible individuals, although the alternative hypothesis that MS is a multigenic disease would also account for this observation. Clinical trials have to date failed to confirm the efficacy of any immunosuppressive or other agent in the management of progressive MS. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appears to be highly sensitive for monitoring the activity of MS. Preliminary evidence suggests that MRI activity correlates with longitudinal clinical assessments of disability. Immunologic tests, while valuable in determining pathophysiology of MS, have not been strongly correlated with clinical outcome.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)53-60
Number of pages8
JournalCanadian Journal of Neurological Sciences
Volume17
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1990
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Multiple Sclerosis
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Clinical Trials
Immunologic Tests
Penetrance
Immunosuppressive Agents
Epidemiology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

The second Canadian conference on multiple sclerosis. / Weinshenker, Brian G; Nelson, R.

In: Canadian Journal of Neurological Sciences, Vol. 17, No. 1, 1990, p. 53-60.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{05b1bb96f05747a3a53439bed3bd4be6,
title = "The second Canadian conference on multiple sclerosis",
abstract = "The epidemiology of multiple sclerosis (MS) and the planning and interpretation of clinical therapeutic trials were the subjects of a symposium on MS held on June 13, 1989. Several speakers addressed whether MS is a genetic or an environmental disease. An environmental trigger would resolve the relatively low penetrance of the disease in susceptible individuals, although the alternative hypothesis that MS is a multigenic disease would also account for this observation. Clinical trials have to date failed to confirm the efficacy of any immunosuppressive or other agent in the management of progressive MS. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appears to be highly sensitive for monitoring the activity of MS. Preliminary evidence suggests that MRI activity correlates with longitudinal clinical assessments of disability. Immunologic tests, while valuable in determining pathophysiology of MS, have not been strongly correlated with clinical outcome.",
author = "Weinshenker, {Brian G} and R. Nelson",
year = "1990",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "17",
pages = "53--60",
journal = "Canadian Journal of Neurological Sciences",
issn = "0317-1671",
publisher = "Canadian Journal of Neurological Sciences",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The second Canadian conference on multiple sclerosis

AU - Weinshenker, Brian G

AU - Nelson, R.

PY - 1990

Y1 - 1990

N2 - The epidemiology of multiple sclerosis (MS) and the planning and interpretation of clinical therapeutic trials were the subjects of a symposium on MS held on June 13, 1989. Several speakers addressed whether MS is a genetic or an environmental disease. An environmental trigger would resolve the relatively low penetrance of the disease in susceptible individuals, although the alternative hypothesis that MS is a multigenic disease would also account for this observation. Clinical trials have to date failed to confirm the efficacy of any immunosuppressive or other agent in the management of progressive MS. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appears to be highly sensitive for monitoring the activity of MS. Preliminary evidence suggests that MRI activity correlates with longitudinal clinical assessments of disability. Immunologic tests, while valuable in determining pathophysiology of MS, have not been strongly correlated with clinical outcome.

AB - The epidemiology of multiple sclerosis (MS) and the planning and interpretation of clinical therapeutic trials were the subjects of a symposium on MS held on June 13, 1989. Several speakers addressed whether MS is a genetic or an environmental disease. An environmental trigger would resolve the relatively low penetrance of the disease in susceptible individuals, although the alternative hypothesis that MS is a multigenic disease would also account for this observation. Clinical trials have to date failed to confirm the efficacy of any immunosuppressive or other agent in the management of progressive MS. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appears to be highly sensitive for monitoring the activity of MS. Preliminary evidence suggests that MRI activity correlates with longitudinal clinical assessments of disability. Immunologic tests, while valuable in determining pathophysiology of MS, have not been strongly correlated with clinical outcome.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0025361253&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0025361253&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 17

SP - 53

EP - 60

JO - Canadian Journal of Neurological Sciences

JF - Canadian Journal of Neurological Sciences

SN - 0317-1671

IS - 1

ER -