The role of oral magnesium supplements for the management of stable bronchial asthma

a systematic review and meta-analysis

Faisal Abuabat, Abdulaziz AlAlwan, Emad Masuadi, Mohammad H Murad, Hamdan Al Jahdali, Mazen Saleh Ferwana

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Asthma is a chronic lung disease characterized by airway inflammation and hyper-responsiveness of airway smooth muscles. There is growing evidence that magnesium may have a role in managing asthma through its dual effect as an anti-inflammatory and bronchodilating agent. To assess the efficacy of oral magnesium supplements in chronic asthmatic patients. In addition to searching through Clinicaltrials.gov/ and references for oral magnesium supplement studies, we performed a database search in Medline, CINAHL, CENTRAL, and Embase. We contacted the authors of the included trials to ask for additional information. We included randomized controlled trials that compared oral magnesium supplements versus placebo, in addition to standard asthma treatment in mild-moderate asthmatic adults and children (older than 6 years). Two reviewers independently performed the study selection, data abstraction, and the assessment of the risk of bias. Eight trials at moderate risk of bias enrolling a total of 917 patients were included. Oral magnesium improved FEV1 at week 8 (5.69 (L/min); 95% CI: 1.92, 9.46; I 2 : 45%). There was no significant improvement in FEV1 at other follow up periods. There was no significant change in FVC, Methacholine challenge test, the frequency of bronchodilator use, or symptoms score. There were no data on mortality or quality of life. Oral magnesium supplements may lead to improvement in FEV1 that was only demonstrated at eight weeks; but no effect on any other outcome. Until future evidence emerges, oral magnesium cannot be recommended as adjuvants to standard treatment for mild to moderate asthmatic individuals.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number4
Journalnpj Primary Care Respiratory Medicine
Volume29
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2019

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Magnesium
Meta-Analysis
Asthma
Respiratory Hypersensitivity
Methacholine Chloride
Bronchodilator Agents
Lung Diseases
Smooth Muscle
Chronic Disease
Anti-Inflammatory Agents
Randomized Controlled Trials
Placebos
Quality of Life
Databases
Inflammation
Mortality
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

The role of oral magnesium supplements for the management of stable bronchial asthma : a systematic review and meta-analysis. / Abuabat, Faisal; AlAlwan, Abdulaziz; Masuadi, Emad; Murad, Mohammad H; Jahdali, Hamdan Al; Ferwana, Mazen Saleh.

In: npj Primary Care Respiratory Medicine, Vol. 29, No. 1, 4, 01.12.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abuabat, Faisal ; AlAlwan, Abdulaziz ; Masuadi, Emad ; Murad, Mohammad H ; Jahdali, Hamdan Al ; Ferwana, Mazen Saleh. / The role of oral magnesium supplements for the management of stable bronchial asthma : a systematic review and meta-analysis. In: npj Primary Care Respiratory Medicine. 2019 ; Vol. 29, No. 1.
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abstract = "Asthma is a chronic lung disease characterized by airway inflammation and hyper-responsiveness of airway smooth muscles. There is growing evidence that magnesium may have a role in managing asthma through its dual effect as an anti-inflammatory and bronchodilating agent. To assess the efficacy of oral magnesium supplements in chronic asthmatic patients. In addition to searching through Clinicaltrials.gov/ and references for oral magnesium supplement studies, we performed a database search in Medline, CINAHL, CENTRAL, and Embase. We contacted the authors of the included trials to ask for additional information. We included randomized controlled trials that compared oral magnesium supplements versus placebo, in addition to standard asthma treatment in mild-moderate asthmatic adults and children (older than 6 years). Two reviewers independently performed the study selection, data abstraction, and the assessment of the risk of bias. Eight trials at moderate risk of bias enrolling a total of 917 patients were included. Oral magnesium improved FEV1 at week 8 (5.69 (L/min); 95{\%} CI: 1.92, 9.46; I 2 : 45{\%}). There was no significant improvement in FEV1 at other follow up periods. There was no significant change in FVC, Methacholine challenge test, the frequency of bronchodilator use, or symptoms score. There were no data on mortality or quality of life. Oral magnesium supplements may lead to improvement in FEV1 that was only demonstrated at eight weeks; but no effect on any other outcome. Until future evidence emerges, oral magnesium cannot be recommended as adjuvants to standard treatment for mild to moderate asthmatic individuals.",
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