The relationship of inferior ST depression, lateral ST elevation, and left precordial ST elevation to myocardium at risk in acute anterior myocardial infarction

W. O. Fletcher, Raymond J Gibbons, I. P. Clements

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Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the presence or absence of ST segment depression in inferior leads (II, III, and aVF) and ST segment elevation in lateral (I and aVL) or left precordial (V5 and V6) leads with the amount and location of myocardium at risk for infarction in patients with acute anterior myocardial infarction. Forty-three patients with anterior infarctions were injected with technetium 99m-sestamibi when they were first seen and underwent tomographic imaging to measure the amount and location of myocardium at risk. Patients with inferior ST depression (n = 10) compared with those without ST depression (n = 33) had perfusion defects that extended significantly further into the lateral wall (47 degrees vs 20 degrees, p = 0.04) and larger anterior injury vectors (6.47 vs 4.92, p = 0.008). There was no significant association with the percentage of myocardium at risk, disease of the right coronary artery, the presence of an inferior perfusion defect, or the size of the inferior injury vector. Among the patients with ST elevation in lateral leads (n = 16) compared with those without (n = 27), there was a significantly more lateral defect border (47 degrees vs 25 degrees, p = 0.007) and a larger anterior injury vector (6.07 vs 4.81, p = 0.01). There was no significant correlation with the percentage of myocardium at risk. A significant relationship could not be demonstrated between the presence of ST elevation in the left precordial leads and any measure of the amount or location of myocardium at risk. These data support the theory that inferior ST depression in patients with transmural anterior ischemia is a "reciprocal" finding and does not represent inferior ischemia. The presence of inferior ST depression or lateral ST elevation is associated with a more lateral perfusion defect. Neither of these ECG findings is associated with the amount of myocardium at risk for infarction.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)526-535
Number of pages10
JournalAmerican Heart Journal
Volume126
Issue number3 PART 1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1993

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Myocardium
Myocardial Infarction
Infarction
Perfusion
Wounds and Injuries
Ischemia
Technetium Tc 99m Sestamibi
Coronary Artery Disease
Electrocardiography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

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title = "The relationship of inferior ST depression, lateral ST elevation, and left precordial ST elevation to myocardium at risk in acute anterior myocardial infarction",
abstract = "The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the presence or absence of ST segment depression in inferior leads (II, III, and aVF) and ST segment elevation in lateral (I and aVL) or left precordial (V5 and V6) leads with the amount and location of myocardium at risk for infarction in patients with acute anterior myocardial infarction. Forty-three patients with anterior infarctions were injected with technetium 99m-sestamibi when they were first seen and underwent tomographic imaging to measure the amount and location of myocardium at risk. Patients with inferior ST depression (n = 10) compared with those without ST depression (n = 33) had perfusion defects that extended significantly further into the lateral wall (47 degrees vs 20 degrees, p = 0.04) and larger anterior injury vectors (6.47 vs 4.92, p = 0.008). There was no significant association with the percentage of myocardium at risk, disease of the right coronary artery, the presence of an inferior perfusion defect, or the size of the inferior injury vector. Among the patients with ST elevation in lateral leads (n = 16) compared with those without (n = 27), there was a significantly more lateral defect border (47 degrees vs 25 degrees, p = 0.007) and a larger anterior injury vector (6.07 vs 4.81, p = 0.01). There was no significant correlation with the percentage of myocardium at risk. A significant relationship could not be demonstrated between the presence of ST elevation in the left precordial leads and any measure of the amount or location of myocardium at risk. These data support the theory that inferior ST depression in patients with transmural anterior ischemia is a {"}reciprocal{"} finding and does not represent inferior ischemia. The presence of inferior ST depression or lateral ST elevation is associated with a more lateral perfusion defect. Neither of these ECG findings is associated with the amount of myocardium at risk for infarction.",
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N2 - The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the presence or absence of ST segment depression in inferior leads (II, III, and aVF) and ST segment elevation in lateral (I and aVL) or left precordial (V5 and V6) leads with the amount and location of myocardium at risk for infarction in patients with acute anterior myocardial infarction. Forty-three patients with anterior infarctions were injected with technetium 99m-sestamibi when they were first seen and underwent tomographic imaging to measure the amount and location of myocardium at risk. Patients with inferior ST depression (n = 10) compared with those without ST depression (n = 33) had perfusion defects that extended significantly further into the lateral wall (47 degrees vs 20 degrees, p = 0.04) and larger anterior injury vectors (6.47 vs 4.92, p = 0.008). There was no significant association with the percentage of myocardium at risk, disease of the right coronary artery, the presence of an inferior perfusion defect, or the size of the inferior injury vector. Among the patients with ST elevation in lateral leads (n = 16) compared with those without (n = 27), there was a significantly more lateral defect border (47 degrees vs 25 degrees, p = 0.007) and a larger anterior injury vector (6.07 vs 4.81, p = 0.01). There was no significant correlation with the percentage of myocardium at risk. A significant relationship could not be demonstrated between the presence of ST elevation in the left precordial leads and any measure of the amount or location of myocardium at risk. These data support the theory that inferior ST depression in patients with transmural anterior ischemia is a "reciprocal" finding and does not represent inferior ischemia. The presence of inferior ST depression or lateral ST elevation is associated with a more lateral perfusion defect. Neither of these ECG findings is associated with the amount of myocardium at risk for infarction.

AB - The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the presence or absence of ST segment depression in inferior leads (II, III, and aVF) and ST segment elevation in lateral (I and aVL) or left precordial (V5 and V6) leads with the amount and location of myocardium at risk for infarction in patients with acute anterior myocardial infarction. Forty-three patients with anterior infarctions were injected with technetium 99m-sestamibi when they were first seen and underwent tomographic imaging to measure the amount and location of myocardium at risk. Patients with inferior ST depression (n = 10) compared with those without ST depression (n = 33) had perfusion defects that extended significantly further into the lateral wall (47 degrees vs 20 degrees, p = 0.04) and larger anterior injury vectors (6.47 vs 4.92, p = 0.008). There was no significant association with the percentage of myocardium at risk, disease of the right coronary artery, the presence of an inferior perfusion defect, or the size of the inferior injury vector. Among the patients with ST elevation in lateral leads (n = 16) compared with those without (n = 27), there was a significantly more lateral defect border (47 degrees vs 25 degrees, p = 0.007) and a larger anterior injury vector (6.07 vs 4.81, p = 0.01). There was no significant correlation with the percentage of myocardium at risk. A significant relationship could not be demonstrated between the presence of ST elevation in the left precordial leads and any measure of the amount or location of myocardium at risk. These data support the theory that inferior ST depression in patients with transmural anterior ischemia is a "reciprocal" finding and does not represent inferior ischemia. The presence of inferior ST depression or lateral ST elevation is associated with a more lateral perfusion defect. Neither of these ECG findings is associated with the amount of myocardium at risk for infarction.

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