The relationship between donor age and cadaveric renal allograft survival is modified by the recipient's blood pressure

Fernando G Cosio, Mitchell Henry, Todd E. Pesavento, Ronald M. Ferguson, Sunny Kim, Stanley Lemeshow

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Increasing donor age correlates with reduced renal allograft survival. In this study we analyzed variables that may modify this relationship. The study included 1285 cadaveric kidney allograft recipients followed for 7.2 + 4.5 years. By Cox, increasing donor age beyond 30 years was associated with significant increases in the hazard ratio for graft loss [age 31-46, hazard ratio (HR) = 1.4, p = 0.02; 46-60, HR = 1.55, p = 0.008; > 60, HR = 1.68, p = 0.03]. Increasing donor age was significantly associated with: older and heavier recipients; higher creatinine and blood pressure (BP) 6 months posttransplant; and lower total cyclosporine dose during the first year. Of interest, the 6-month serum creatinine and the BP level modified significantly the relationship between age and survival. Thus, increasing donor age was significantly related to reduced graft survival only in patients with a 6-month creatinine < 2 mg/dL. Furthermore, donor age related significantly to graft survival only among patients with higher BP levels 6 month post transplant. It is concluded that increasing donor age is associated with reduced cadaveric graft survival, but that relationship is significantly modified by graft function and BP. These data suggest that poorly functioning kidneys have reduced survival irrespective of age. Furthermore, elevated BP levels may have a particularly negative effect on the survival of older grafts.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)340-347
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Transplantation
Volume3
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2003
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Allografts
Tissue Donors
Graft Survival
Blood Pressure
Kidney
Creatinine
Transplants
Hypertension
Survival
Cyclosporine
Serum

Keywords

  • Blood pressure
  • Donor age
  • Hypertension
  • Kidney transplant
  • Survival

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

Cite this

The relationship between donor age and cadaveric renal allograft survival is modified by the recipient's blood pressure. / Cosio, Fernando G; Henry, Mitchell; Pesavento, Todd E.; Ferguson, Ronald M.; Kim, Sunny; Lemeshow, Stanley.

In: American Journal of Transplantation, Vol. 3, No. 3, 03.2003, p. 340-347.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cosio, Fernando G ; Henry, Mitchell ; Pesavento, Todd E. ; Ferguson, Ronald M. ; Kim, Sunny ; Lemeshow, Stanley. / The relationship between donor age and cadaveric renal allograft survival is modified by the recipient's blood pressure. In: American Journal of Transplantation. 2003 ; Vol. 3, No. 3. pp. 340-347.
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