The relationship between COMT genotype and the clinical effectiveness of tolcapone, a COMT inhibitor, in patients with Parkinson's disease

Derek J. Chong, Oksana Suchowersky, Carol Szumlanski, Richard M. Weinshilboum, Rolin Brant, Norm R.C. Campbell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

38 Scopus citations

Abstract

Patients with Parkinson's Disease (PD) have a variable response to tolcapone, a catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) inhibitor. In addition, a subset of patients develop severe diarrhea as a side effect. Two codominant alleles for the COMT gene exist, coding for low and high activity, resulting in low-, medium-, and high-activity genotypes. This study investigates the relationship between this variation in genotype and clinical effects in patients with PD taking tolcapone. To investigate the relationship between COMT polymorphism and clinical response, 24 patients who completed tolcapone clinical trials provided blood samples for COMT genotype analysis. Change in levodopa dose and United Parkinson Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) Part III (motor subscale) were analyzed at baseline, at 1-2 weeks, and 6 months after initiation of tolcapone. Genotype analysis was performed on seven patients who had diarrhea as a side effect. There was no significant correlation between genotype and improvement in UPDRS score (p = 0.29) according to a linear models approach that adjusted for the subject's severity of PD, tolcapone dose (either 100 or 200 mg three times daily) and initial differences in baseline scores. No significant difference was seen in change in daily levodopa intake and genotype. There was also no relation between diarrhea and COMT genotype. These results indicate that, in the treatment of Parkinson's disease, COMT genotype is not a major contributor to the clinical response to tolcapone.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)143-148
Number of pages6
JournalClinical Neuropharmacology
Volume23
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2000

Keywords

  • Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT)
  • Diarrhea
  • Parkinson's disease
  • Pharmacogenetics
  • Polymorphism
  • Tolcapone

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Pharmacology (medical)

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