The psychosocial vulnerability model of hostility as a predictor of coronary heart disease in low-income African Americans

Karen B. Grothe, Jamie S. Bodenlos, Dori Whitehead, Jake Olivier, Phillip J. Brantley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

The current study examined social support and stress as mediators of the hostility - coronary heart disease (CHD) relationship as suggested by the psychosocial vulnerability model in a sample of low-income African Americans. Among 95 CHD patients and 30 healthy controls, hostility was negatively correlated with social support, but was not related to minor stress. CHD patients endorsed higher levels of hostility; however, the relationship between hostility and CHD status was diminished once stress and social support were included in the model. This study lends partial support for the psychosocial vulnerability model of hostility in African Americans, but suggests that the relationship between hostility and stress may be impacted by socioeconomic status.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)163-169
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Clinical Psychology in Medical Settings
Volume15
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2008

Keywords

  • African American
  • Heart disease
  • Hostility
  • Social support
  • Stress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology

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