The PROMIS fatigue item bank has good measurement properties in patients with fibromyalgia and severe fatigue

Kathleen J Yost, Niels G. Waller, Minji K. Lee, Ann Vincent

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: Efficient management of fibromyalgia (FM) requires precise measurement of FM-specific symptoms. Our objective was to assess the measurement properties of the Patient-Reported Outcome Measurement Information System (PROMIS) fatigue item bank (FIB) in people with FM. Methods: We applied classical psychometric and item response theory methods to cross-sectional PROMIS-FIB data from two samples. Data on the clinical FM sample were obtained at a tertiary medical center. Data for the U.S. general population sample were obtained from the PROMIS network. The full 95-item bank was administered to both samples. We investigated dimensionality of the item bank in both samples by separately fitting a bifactor model with two group factors; experience and impact. We assessed measurement invariance between samples, and we explored an alternate factor structure with the normative sample and subsequently confirmed that structure in the clinical sample. Finally, we assessed whether reporting FM subdomain scores added value over reporting a single total score. Results: The item bank was dominated by a general fatigue factor. The fit of the initial bifactor model and evidence of measurement invariance indicated that the same constructs were measured across the samples. An alternative bifactor model with three group factors demonstrated slightly improved fit. Subdomain scores add value over a total score. Conclusions: We demonstrated that the PROMIS-FIB is appropriate for measuring fatigue in clinical samples of FM patients. The construct can be presented by a single score; however, subdomain scores for the three group factors identified in the alternative model may also be reported.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-10
Number of pages10
JournalQuality of Life Research
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 30 2017

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Fibromyalgia
Information Systems
Fatigue
Information Services
Psychometrics
Patient Reported Outcome Measures
Databases
Population

Keywords

  • Fatigue
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Item response theory
  • Patient-Reported Outcome Measurement Information System (PROMIS)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

The PROMIS fatigue item bank has good measurement properties in patients with fibromyalgia and severe fatigue. / Yost, Kathleen J; Waller, Niels G.; Lee, Minji K.; Vincent, Ann.

In: Quality of Life Research, 30.01.2017, p. 1-10.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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