The prognostic role of the preoperative absolute lymphocyte count and absolute monocyte count in patients with resected advanced melanoma

Nicole M. Rochet, Lisa A. Kottschade, Travis E. Grotz, Luis F. Porrata, Svetomir Nenad Markovic

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: Published data have reported that components of the peripheral blood are significant prognostic factors in hematologic and solid malignancies. Thus, we sought to investigate if the preoperative absolute lymphocyte count (ALC) and absolute monocyte count (AMC) affects disease progression and survival after complete surgical resection of advanced malignant melanoma. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed records of 227 patients with resected advanced malignant melanoma (153 stage III and 74 stage IV) that were treated at the Mayo Clinic from 2000 to 2010. Survival analysis was performed using the Kaplan-Meier method, log-rank tests, and the Cox proportional hazards model for the univariate and multivariate analysis. Results: Surgically resected stage III melanoma patients with a preoperative AMC<0.6×10 9/L experienced a longer overall survival (OS) versus AMC≥0.6×10 9/L (median: 63.9 vs. 34.8 mo, respectively, P<0.008). Multivariate analysis showed AMC to be an independent predictor for OS in stage III patients. Stage IV resected melanoma patients with an ALC≥1.9×10 9/L experienced a superior median relapse-free survival (RFS) compared with patients with an ALC<1.9×10 9/L (median: 11.4 vs. 5.4 mo, respectively, P<0.006). Multivariate analysis showed ALC to be an independent predictor for RFS in stage IV patients. Conclusions: These data showed that in surgically resected stage III melanoma, preoperative AMC is an independent prognostic factor for OS. In contrast, a higher preoperative ALC is an independent prognostic for longer RFS in surgically resected stage IV melanoma.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)252-258
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Oncology: Cancer Clinical Trials
Volume38
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 9 2015

Fingerprint

Lymphocyte Count
Monocytes
Melanoma
Survival
Multivariate Analysis
Recurrence
Hematologic Neoplasms
Survival Analysis
Proportional Hazards Models
Disease Progression

Keywords

  • absolute lymphocyte count
  • absolute monocyte count
  • advanced stage
  • malignant melanoma
  • survival

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

The prognostic role of the preoperative absolute lymphocyte count and absolute monocyte count in patients with resected advanced melanoma. / Rochet, Nicole M.; Kottschade, Lisa A.; Grotz, Travis E.; Porrata, Luis F.; Markovic, Svetomir Nenad.

In: American Journal of Clinical Oncology: Cancer Clinical Trials, Vol. 38, No. 3, 09.06.2015, p. 252-258.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Objectives: Published data have reported that components of the peripheral blood are significant prognostic factors in hematologic and solid malignancies. Thus, we sought to investigate if the preoperative absolute lymphocyte count (ALC) and absolute monocyte count (AMC) affects disease progression and survival after complete surgical resection of advanced malignant melanoma. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed records of 227 patients with resected advanced malignant melanoma (153 stage III and 74 stage IV) that were treated at the Mayo Clinic from 2000 to 2010. Survival analysis was performed using the Kaplan-Meier method, log-rank tests, and the Cox proportional hazards model for the univariate and multivariate analysis. Results: Surgically resected stage III melanoma patients with a preoperative AMC<0.6×10 9/L experienced a longer overall survival (OS) versus AMC≥0.6×10 9/L (median: 63.9 vs. 34.8 mo, respectively, P<0.008). Multivariate analysis showed AMC to be an independent predictor for OS in stage III patients. Stage IV resected melanoma patients with an ALC≥1.9×10 9/L experienced a superior median relapse-free survival (RFS) compared with patients with an ALC<1.9×10 9/L (median: 11.4 vs. 5.4 mo, respectively, P<0.006). Multivariate analysis showed ALC to be an independent predictor for RFS in stage IV patients. Conclusions: These data showed that in surgically resected stage III melanoma, preoperative AMC is an independent prognostic factor for OS. In contrast, a higher preoperative ALC is an independent prognostic for longer RFS in surgically resected stage IV melanoma.",
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AB - Objectives: Published data have reported that components of the peripheral blood are significant prognostic factors in hematologic and solid malignancies. Thus, we sought to investigate if the preoperative absolute lymphocyte count (ALC) and absolute monocyte count (AMC) affects disease progression and survival after complete surgical resection of advanced malignant melanoma. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed records of 227 patients with resected advanced malignant melanoma (153 stage III and 74 stage IV) that were treated at the Mayo Clinic from 2000 to 2010. Survival analysis was performed using the Kaplan-Meier method, log-rank tests, and the Cox proportional hazards model for the univariate and multivariate analysis. Results: Surgically resected stage III melanoma patients with a preoperative AMC<0.6×10 9/L experienced a longer overall survival (OS) versus AMC≥0.6×10 9/L (median: 63.9 vs. 34.8 mo, respectively, P<0.008). Multivariate analysis showed AMC to be an independent predictor for OS in stage III patients. Stage IV resected melanoma patients with an ALC≥1.9×10 9/L experienced a superior median relapse-free survival (RFS) compared with patients with an ALC<1.9×10 9/L (median: 11.4 vs. 5.4 mo, respectively, P<0.006). Multivariate analysis showed ALC to be an independent predictor for RFS in stage IV patients. Conclusions: These data showed that in surgically resected stage III melanoma, preoperative AMC is an independent prognostic factor for OS. In contrast, a higher preoperative ALC is an independent prognostic for longer RFS in surgically resected stage IV melanoma.

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