The prognostic impact of concomitant coronary artery bypass grafting during aortic valve surgery: Implications for revascularization in the transcatheter era

Nassir M. Thalji, Rakesh M. Suri, Richard C. Daly, Kevin L. Greason, Joseph A. Dearani, John M. Stulak, Lyle D. Joyce, Harold M. Burkhart, Alberto Pochettino, Zhuo Li, Robert L. Frye, Hartzell V Schaff

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Abstract

Objective Clinicians may give greater consideration to medical management versus coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) for coronary artery disease (CAD) at the time of aortic valve intervention. We evaluated the prognostic impact of revascularization strategy during aortic valve replacement (AVR). Methods We studied 1308 consecutive patients with significant CAD (≥50% stenosis) undergoing AVR with or with out CABG between 2001 and 2010. Late mortality and its determinants were analyzed using multivariable Cox models. Results Patients undergoing CABG (n = 1043; 18%) had more frequent angina (50% vs 26%; P <.001), left ventricular dysfunction (22% vs 14%; P =.003), advanced (>70% stenosis) CAD (85% vs 48%; P <.001), and incidence of triple-vessel/left-main CAD (44% vs 8%; P <.001). Whereas operative mortality was comparable between patients undergoing AVR plus CABG versus isolated AVR (2.9% vs 3.0%; P =.90), 5-year (72% vs 64%) and 8-year (50% vs 39%) survival was higher following CABG (P =.007). Adjusting for older age (hazard ratio [HR], 1.28 per 5 years), female sex (HR, 1.23), peripheral vascular disease (HR, 1.71), New York Heart Association functional class III to IV (HR, 1.48), and diabetes (HR, 1.50) concomitant CABG at AVR reduced late mortality risk by more than one-third (HR, 0.62, 95% confidence interval, 0.49-0.79; P <.001). CABG continued to confer a survival advantage in patients with moderate (50%-70%) (HR, 0.62; P =.02) and severe (>70%) CAD (HR, 0.62; P =.002). Conclusions In patients undergoing AVR with coexistent CAD, concomitant CABG reduces risk of late death by more than one-third, without augmenting operative mortality. This survival advantage persists in moderate (50% to 70%) and severe (>70%) CAD. These findings underline the prognostic importance of revascularization in this population and should influence decisions regarding revascularization strategy in patients undergoing transcatheter valve therapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)451-460.e2
JournalJournal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery
Volume149
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2015

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Aortic Valve
Coronary Artery Bypass
Coronary Artery Disease
Mortality
Aortic Valve Stenosis
Proportional Hazards Models
Pathologic Constriction
Survival
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Surgery
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

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The prognostic impact of concomitant coronary artery bypass grafting during aortic valve surgery : Implications for revascularization in the transcatheter era. / Thalji, Nassir M.; Suri, Rakesh M.; Daly, Richard C.; Greason, Kevin L.; Dearani, Joseph A.; Stulak, John M.; Joyce, Lyle D.; Burkhart, Harold M.; Pochettino, Alberto; Li, Zhuo; Frye, Robert L.; Schaff, Hartzell V.

In: Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Vol. 149, No. 2, 01.02.2015, p. 451-460.e2.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Thalji, Nassir M. ; Suri, Rakesh M. ; Daly, Richard C. ; Greason, Kevin L. ; Dearani, Joseph A. ; Stulak, John M. ; Joyce, Lyle D. ; Burkhart, Harold M. ; Pochettino, Alberto ; Li, Zhuo ; Frye, Robert L. ; Schaff, Hartzell V. / The prognostic impact of concomitant coronary artery bypass grafting during aortic valve surgery : Implications for revascularization in the transcatheter era. In: Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery. 2015 ; Vol. 149, No. 2. pp. 451-460.e2.
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title = "The prognostic impact of concomitant coronary artery bypass grafting during aortic valve surgery: Implications for revascularization in the transcatheter era",
abstract = "Objective Clinicians may give greater consideration to medical management versus coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) for coronary artery disease (CAD) at the time of aortic valve intervention. We evaluated the prognostic impact of revascularization strategy during aortic valve replacement (AVR). Methods We studied 1308 consecutive patients with significant CAD (≥50{\%} stenosis) undergoing AVR with or with out CABG between 2001 and 2010. Late mortality and its determinants were analyzed using multivariable Cox models. Results Patients undergoing CABG (n = 1043; 18{\%}) had more frequent angina (50{\%} vs 26{\%}; P <.001), left ventricular dysfunction (22{\%} vs 14{\%}; P =.003), advanced (>70{\%} stenosis) CAD (85{\%} vs 48{\%}; P <.001), and incidence of triple-vessel/left-main CAD (44{\%} vs 8{\%}; P <.001). Whereas operative mortality was comparable between patients undergoing AVR plus CABG versus isolated AVR (2.9{\%} vs 3.0{\%}; P =.90), 5-year (72{\%} vs 64{\%}) and 8-year (50{\%} vs 39{\%}) survival was higher following CABG (P =.007). Adjusting for older age (hazard ratio [HR], 1.28 per 5 years), female sex (HR, 1.23), peripheral vascular disease (HR, 1.71), New York Heart Association functional class III to IV (HR, 1.48), and diabetes (HR, 1.50) concomitant CABG at AVR reduced late mortality risk by more than one-third (HR, 0.62, 95{\%} confidence interval, 0.49-0.79; P <.001). CABG continued to confer a survival advantage in patients with moderate (50{\%}-70{\%}) (HR, 0.62; P =.02) and severe (>70{\%}) CAD (HR, 0.62; P =.002). Conclusions In patients undergoing AVR with coexistent CAD, concomitant CABG reduces risk of late death by more than one-third, without augmenting operative mortality. This survival advantage persists in moderate (50{\%} to 70{\%}) and severe (>70{\%}) CAD. These findings underline the prognostic importance of revascularization in this population and should influence decisions regarding revascularization strategy in patients undergoing transcatheter valve therapy.",
author = "Thalji, {Nassir M.} and Suri, {Rakesh M.} and Daly, {Richard C.} and Greason, {Kevin L.} and Dearani, {Joseph A.} and Stulak, {John M.} and Joyce, {Lyle D.} and Burkhart, {Harold M.} and Alberto Pochettino and Zhuo Li and Frye, {Robert L.} and Schaff, {Hartzell V}",
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T1 - The prognostic impact of concomitant coronary artery bypass grafting during aortic valve surgery

T2 - Implications for revascularization in the transcatheter era

AU - Thalji, Nassir M.

AU - Suri, Rakesh M.

AU - Daly, Richard C.

AU - Greason, Kevin L.

AU - Dearani, Joseph A.

AU - Stulak, John M.

AU - Joyce, Lyle D.

AU - Burkhart, Harold M.

AU - Pochettino, Alberto

AU - Li, Zhuo

AU - Frye, Robert L.

AU - Schaff, Hartzell V

PY - 2015/2/1

Y1 - 2015/2/1

N2 - Objective Clinicians may give greater consideration to medical management versus coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) for coronary artery disease (CAD) at the time of aortic valve intervention. We evaluated the prognostic impact of revascularization strategy during aortic valve replacement (AVR). Methods We studied 1308 consecutive patients with significant CAD (≥50% stenosis) undergoing AVR with or with out CABG between 2001 and 2010. Late mortality and its determinants were analyzed using multivariable Cox models. Results Patients undergoing CABG (n = 1043; 18%) had more frequent angina (50% vs 26%; P <.001), left ventricular dysfunction (22% vs 14%; P =.003), advanced (>70% stenosis) CAD (85% vs 48%; P <.001), and incidence of triple-vessel/left-main CAD (44% vs 8%; P <.001). Whereas operative mortality was comparable between patients undergoing AVR plus CABG versus isolated AVR (2.9% vs 3.0%; P =.90), 5-year (72% vs 64%) and 8-year (50% vs 39%) survival was higher following CABG (P =.007). Adjusting for older age (hazard ratio [HR], 1.28 per 5 years), female sex (HR, 1.23), peripheral vascular disease (HR, 1.71), New York Heart Association functional class III to IV (HR, 1.48), and diabetes (HR, 1.50) concomitant CABG at AVR reduced late mortality risk by more than one-third (HR, 0.62, 95% confidence interval, 0.49-0.79; P <.001). CABG continued to confer a survival advantage in patients with moderate (50%-70%) (HR, 0.62; P =.02) and severe (>70%) CAD (HR, 0.62; P =.002). Conclusions In patients undergoing AVR with coexistent CAD, concomitant CABG reduces risk of late death by more than one-third, without augmenting operative mortality. This survival advantage persists in moderate (50% to 70%) and severe (>70%) CAD. These findings underline the prognostic importance of revascularization in this population and should influence decisions regarding revascularization strategy in patients undergoing transcatheter valve therapy.

AB - Objective Clinicians may give greater consideration to medical management versus coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) for coronary artery disease (CAD) at the time of aortic valve intervention. We evaluated the prognostic impact of revascularization strategy during aortic valve replacement (AVR). Methods We studied 1308 consecutive patients with significant CAD (≥50% stenosis) undergoing AVR with or with out CABG between 2001 and 2010. Late mortality and its determinants were analyzed using multivariable Cox models. Results Patients undergoing CABG (n = 1043; 18%) had more frequent angina (50% vs 26%; P <.001), left ventricular dysfunction (22% vs 14%; P =.003), advanced (>70% stenosis) CAD (85% vs 48%; P <.001), and incidence of triple-vessel/left-main CAD (44% vs 8%; P <.001). Whereas operative mortality was comparable between patients undergoing AVR plus CABG versus isolated AVR (2.9% vs 3.0%; P =.90), 5-year (72% vs 64%) and 8-year (50% vs 39%) survival was higher following CABG (P =.007). Adjusting for older age (hazard ratio [HR], 1.28 per 5 years), female sex (HR, 1.23), peripheral vascular disease (HR, 1.71), New York Heart Association functional class III to IV (HR, 1.48), and diabetes (HR, 1.50) concomitant CABG at AVR reduced late mortality risk by more than one-third (HR, 0.62, 95% confidence interval, 0.49-0.79; P <.001). CABG continued to confer a survival advantage in patients with moderate (50%-70%) (HR, 0.62; P =.02) and severe (>70%) CAD (HR, 0.62; P =.002). Conclusions In patients undergoing AVR with coexistent CAD, concomitant CABG reduces risk of late death by more than one-third, without augmenting operative mortality. This survival advantage persists in moderate (50% to 70%) and severe (>70%) CAD. These findings underline the prognostic importance of revascularization in this population and should influence decisions regarding revascularization strategy in patients undergoing transcatheter valve therapy.

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