The prevalence of major psychiatric pathologies in patients with voice disorders

Natasha Mirza, Cesar Ruiz, Eric D. Baum, Jeffrey P. Staab

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

59 Scopus citations

Abstract

We conducted a study of 47 patients with various voice disorders to determine the prevalence of concomitant psychopathology. The prevalence of psychiatric symptoms varied considerably among patients with the three most common voice disorders: 63.6% among patients with vocal fold paralysis, 29.4% among those with functional dysphonia, and 7.1% among those with spasmodic dysphonia. Levels of anxiety and depression correlated moderately with the severity of voice symptoms in patients with vocal fold paralysis, but not in those with functional or spasmodic dysphonia. Certain abnormal personality traits - including interpersonal sensitivity and distrust of others - were more common among patients with functional dysphonia. The low rate of psychopathology among patients with spasmodic dysphonia is consistent with rates reported in previous investigations. Our findings suggest that the prevalence of psychopathology in patients with voice disorders varies according to the specific voice diagnosis, as does the relationship between specific psychiatric and voice symptoms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)808-814
Number of pages7
JournalEar, Nose and Throat Journal
Volume82
Issue number10
StatePublished - Oct 1 2003

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology

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