The Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori Remains High in African American and Hispanic Veterans

Theresa Nguyen, David Ramsey, David Graham, Yasser Shaib, Seiji Shiota, Maria Velez, Rhonda Cole, Bhupinderjit Anand, Marcelo Vela, Hashem B. El-Serag

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Helicobacter pylori in the United States has been declining in the 1990s albeit less so among blacks and Hispanics. As the socioeconomic status of racial groups has evolved, it remains unclear whether the prevalence or the racial and ethnic disparities in the prevalence of H. pylori have changed. Methods: This is a cross-sectional study from a Veteran Affairs center among patients aged 40-80 years old who underwent a study esophagogastroduodenoscopy with gastric biopsies, which were cultured for H. pylori irrespective of findings on histopathology. Positive H. pylori was defined as positive culture or histopathology (stained organism combined with active gastritis). We calculated age-, race-, and birth cohort-specific H. pylori prevalence rates and examined predictors of H. pylori infection in logistic regression models. Results: We analyzed data on 1200 patients; most (92.8%) were men and non-Hispanic white (59.9%) or black (28.9%). H. pylori was positive in 347 (28.9%) and was highest among black males aged 50-59 (53.3%; 44.0-62.4%), followed by Hispanic males aged 60-69 (48.1%; 34.2-62.2%), and lowest in non-Hispanic white males aged 40-49 (8.2%; 2.7-20.5%). In multivariate analysis, age group 50-59 was significantly associated with H. pylori (adjusted odds ratio (OR), 2.32; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.21-4.45) compared with those aged 40-49, and with black race (adjusted OR, 2.57; 95% CI, 1.83-3.60) and Hispanic ethnicity (adjusted OR, 3.01; 95% CI, 1.70-5.34) compared with non-Hispanic white. Irrespective of age group, patients born during 1960-1969 had a lower risk of H. pylori (adjusted OR, 0.45; 95% CI, 0.22-0.96) compared to those born in 1930-1939. Those with some college education were less likely to have H. pylori compared to those with no college education (adjusted OR 0.51; 95% CI, 0.37-0.69). Conclusion: Among veterans, the prevalence of active H. pylori remains high (28.9%) with even higher rates in blacks and Hispanics with lower education levels.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)305-315
Number of pages11
JournalHelicobacter
Volume20
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2015
Externally publishedYes

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Veterans
Hispanic Americans
Helicobacter pylori
African Americans
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Education
Age Groups
Logistic Models
Digestive System Endoscopy
Helicobacter Infections
Gastritis
Social Class
Stomach
Multivariate Analysis
Cross-Sectional Studies
Parturition
Biopsy

Keywords

  • Age group
  • Birth cohort
  • Helicobacter pylori
  • Race
  • Socioeconomic status

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Nguyen, T., Ramsey, D., Graham, D., Shaib, Y., Shiota, S., Velez, M., ... El-Serag, H. B. (2015). The Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori Remains High in African American and Hispanic Veterans. Helicobacter, 20(4), 305-315. https://doi.org/10.1111/hel.12199

The Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori Remains High in African American and Hispanic Veterans. / Nguyen, Theresa; Ramsey, David; Graham, David; Shaib, Yasser; Shiota, Seiji; Velez, Maria; Cole, Rhonda; Anand, Bhupinderjit; Vela, Marcelo; El-Serag, Hashem B.

In: Helicobacter, Vol. 20, No. 4, 01.08.2015, p. 305-315.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nguyen, T, Ramsey, D, Graham, D, Shaib, Y, Shiota, S, Velez, M, Cole, R, Anand, B, Vela, M & El-Serag, HB 2015, 'The Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori Remains High in African American and Hispanic Veterans', Helicobacter, vol. 20, no. 4, pp. 305-315. https://doi.org/10.1111/hel.12199
Nguyen T, Ramsey D, Graham D, Shaib Y, Shiota S, Velez M et al. The Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori Remains High in African American and Hispanic Veterans. Helicobacter. 2015 Aug 1;20(4):305-315. https://doi.org/10.1111/hel.12199
Nguyen, Theresa ; Ramsey, David ; Graham, David ; Shaib, Yasser ; Shiota, Seiji ; Velez, Maria ; Cole, Rhonda ; Anand, Bhupinderjit ; Vela, Marcelo ; El-Serag, Hashem B. / The Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori Remains High in African American and Hispanic Veterans. In: Helicobacter. 2015 ; Vol. 20, No. 4. pp. 305-315.
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AU - Velez, Maria

AU - Cole, Rhonda

AU - Anand, Bhupinderjit

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AU - El-Serag, Hashem B.

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