The preferences of adult outpatients in medical or dental care settings for giving saliva, urine or blood for clinical testing

Sreenivas Koka, Timothy J. Beebe, Stephen P. Merry, Ramona S. BeJesus, Lorenzo B. Berlanga, Amy L. Weaver, Victor Manuel Montori, David T. Wong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. The design of new diagnostic tests would benefit from knowing patients' preferences for the collection of bodily fluids. These preferences, however, are unknown. The authors assessed patients' preferences for the collection of saliva, urine and blood as diagnostic fluids. Methods. The authors handed out surveys adult outpatients who sought treatment at two medical care sites and one dental care site at a medical center regarding the comfort, convenience and ease of collection of saliva, urine and blood for diagnostic testing. Results. A total of 413 surveys were completed. Subjects regarded the donation of saliva as more comfortable and convenient than that of blood or urine at the doctor's (physician's or dentist's) office, and they reported that saliva and urine are easiest to collect at home compared with blood. Male subjects and subjects who had ever donated saliva were more likely to perceive saliva donation in the doctor's office favorably. Subjects at all care sites regarded the donation of saliva as more comfortable and convenient than that of blood or urine; however, subjects at the dental care site perceived saliva donation more favorably than did subjects at the medical care sites. In addition, respondents said they were more willing to participate in research and medical testing if it required saliva donation rather than urine or blood collection. Conclusions. In terms of convenience and comfort, saliva compared well with blood and urine as a diagnostic fluid for clinical and research testing. Patients who sought care at both medical and dental sites shared these perceptions. Clinical Implications. Given strong patient preferences, saliva may be the fluid of choice for the development and implementation of patient-centered diagnostic tests in research and practice.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)735-740
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of the American Dental Association
Volume139
Issue number6
StatePublished - Jun 2008

Fingerprint

Dental Care
Saliva
Outpatients
Urine
Patient Preference
Urine Specimen Collection
Routine Diagnostic Tests
Dentists
Research
Biomedical Research
Tooth
Physicians

Keywords

  • Clinical practice
  • Diagnosis
  • Health care utilization
  • Saliva

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

Koka, S., Beebe, T. J., Merry, S. P., BeJesus, R. S., Berlanga, L. B., Weaver, A. L., ... Wong, D. T. (2008). The preferences of adult outpatients in medical or dental care settings for giving saliva, urine or blood for clinical testing. Journal of the American Dental Association, 139(6), 735-740.

The preferences of adult outpatients in medical or dental care settings for giving saliva, urine or blood for clinical testing. / Koka, Sreenivas; Beebe, Timothy J.; Merry, Stephen P.; BeJesus, Ramona S.; Berlanga, Lorenzo B.; Weaver, Amy L.; Montori, Victor Manuel; Wong, David T.

In: Journal of the American Dental Association, Vol. 139, No. 6, 06.2008, p. 735-740.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Koka, S, Beebe, TJ, Merry, SP, BeJesus, RS, Berlanga, LB, Weaver, AL, Montori, VM & Wong, DT 2008, 'The preferences of adult outpatients in medical or dental care settings for giving saliva, urine or blood for clinical testing', Journal of the American Dental Association, vol. 139, no. 6, pp. 735-740.
Koka, Sreenivas ; Beebe, Timothy J. ; Merry, Stephen P. ; BeJesus, Ramona S. ; Berlanga, Lorenzo B. ; Weaver, Amy L. ; Montori, Victor Manuel ; Wong, David T. / The preferences of adult outpatients in medical or dental care settings for giving saliva, urine or blood for clinical testing. In: Journal of the American Dental Association. 2008 ; Vol. 139, No. 6. pp. 735-740.
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