The power of social structure: How we became an intelligent lineage

Marina Walther-Antonio, Dirk Schulze-Makuch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

New findings pertinent to the human lineage origin (Ardipithecus ramidus) prompt a new analysis of the extrapolation of the social behavior of our closest relatives, the great apes, into human 'natural social behavior'. With the new findings it becomes clear that human ancestors had very divergent social arrangements from the ones we observe today in our closest genetic relatives. The social structure of chimpanzees and gorillas is characterized by male competition. Aggression and the instigation of fear are common place. The morphology of A. ramidus points in the direction of a social system characterized by female-choice instead of male-male competition. This system tends to be characterized by reduced aggression levels, leading to more stable arrangements. It is postulated here that the social stability with accompanying group cohesion propitiated by this setting is favorable to the investment in more complex behaviors, the development of innovative approaches to solve familiar problems, an increase in exploratory behavior, and eventually higher intelligence and the use of sophisticated tools and technology. The concentration of research efforts into the study of social animals with similar social systems (e.g., New World social monkeys (Callitrichidae), social canids (Canidae) and social rodents (Rodentia)) are likely to provide new insights into the understanding of what factors determined our evolution into an intelligent species capable of advanced technology.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)15-23
Number of pages9
JournalInternational Journal of Astrobiology
Volume10
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2011
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

social structure
social behavior
aggression
chimpanzees
apes
Canidae
Gorilla
Callitrichidae
advanced technology
Pongidae
Rodentia
fear
fearfulness
cohesion
monkeys
Pan troglodytes
ancestry
intelligence
animals
extrapolation

Keywords

  • advanced life
  • Ardipithecus
  • ETI
  • evolution
  • female-choice
  • intelligence
  • social

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Space and Planetary Science
  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Physics and Astronomy (miscellaneous)
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

The power of social structure : How we became an intelligent lineage. / Walther-Antonio, Marina; Schulze-Makuch, Dirk.

In: International Journal of Astrobiology, Vol. 10, No. 1, 01.2011, p. 15-23.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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