The neuroanatomy of pure apraxia of speech in stroke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The left insula or Broca's area have been proposed as the neuroanatomical correlate for apraxia of speech (AOS) based on studies of patients with both AOS and aphasia due to stroke. Studies of neurodegenerative AOS suggest the premotor area and the supplementary motor areas as the anatomical correlates. The study objective was to determine the common infarction area in patients with pure AOS due to stroke. Patients with AOS and no or equivocal aphasia due to ischemic stroke were identified through a pre-existing database. Seven subjects were identified. Five had pure AOS, and two had equivocal aphasia. MRI lesion analysis revealed maximal overlap spanning the left premotor and motor cortices. While both neurodegenerative AOS and stroke induced pure AOS involve the premotor cortex, further studies are needed to establish whether stroke-induced AOS and neurodegenerative AOS share a common anatomic substrate.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)43-46
Number of pages4
JournalBrain and Language
Volume129
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2014

Fingerprint

Neuroanatomy
Apraxias
stroke
Stroke
Motor Cortex
Aphasia
speech disorder
Apraxia of Speech
Infarction
Databases

Keywords

  • Aphemia
  • Apraxia of speech
  • Premotor cortex
  • Stroke

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Linguistics and Language
  • Speech and Hearing
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Language and Linguistics
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

The neuroanatomy of pure apraxia of speech in stroke. / Graff-Radford, Jonathan; Jones, David T; Strand, Edythe A.; Rabinstein, Alejandro; Duffy, Joseph R.; Josephs, Keith Anthony.

In: Brain and Language, Vol. 129, No. 1, 02.2014, p. 43-46.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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