The natural history of the anterior cruciate ligament-deficient knee. Changes in synovial fluid cytokine and keratan sulfate concentrations

Michelle Cameron, Andreas Buchgraber, Hans Passler, Molly Vogt, Eugene Thonar, Freddie Fu, Christopher H Evans

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

161 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Restoring knee stability through reconstruction, while providing symptomatic relief, has not been shown tO decrease the incidence of degenerative changes after rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament. This suggests that posttraumatic osteoarthritis may not be purely biomechanical in origin, but also biochemical. To test this, we measured the levels of seven cytokine modulators of cartilage metabolism in knee joint synovial fluid after anterior cruciate ligament rupture. We also measured keratan sulfate, a product of articular cartilage catabolism. The sample population consisted of patients with uninjured knee joints (N = 10), and patients with acute (N = 60), subacute (N = 18), and chronic (N = 8) anterior cruciate ligament- deficient knees. Synovial fluid samples were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Normal synovial fluids contained high levels of the interleukin-1 receptor antagonist but low concentrations of other cytokines. Immediately after ligament rupture there were large increases in interleukins 6 and 8, tumor necrosis factor α, and keratan sulfate. Interleukin-1 levels remained low throughout the course. As the injury became subacute and then chronic, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, and keratan sulfate levels fell but remained considerably elevated 3 months after injury. Concentrations of interleukin-1Ra fell dramatically. Granulocyte-macrophage colony- stimulating factor concentrations were normal acutely and subacutely but by 3 months after injury were elevated 10-fold. Our data reveal a persistent and evolving disturbance in cytokine and keratan sulfate profiles within the anterior cruciate ligament-deficient knee, suggesting an important biochemical dimension to the development of osteoarthritis there.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)751-754
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Sports Medicine
Volume25
Issue number6
StatePublished - 1997
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Keratan Sulfate
Anterior Cruciate Ligament
Synovial Fluid
Natural History
Knee
Cytokines
Rupture
Knee Joint
Osteoarthritis
Interleukin-6
Wounds and Injuries
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha
Interleukin-1 Receptors
Interleukins
Articular Cartilage
Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor
Interleukin-8
Interleukin-1
Ligaments
Cartilage

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

The natural history of the anterior cruciate ligament-deficient knee. Changes in synovial fluid cytokine and keratan sulfate concentrations. / Cameron, Michelle; Buchgraber, Andreas; Passler, Hans; Vogt, Molly; Thonar, Eugene; Fu, Freddie; Evans, Christopher H.

In: American Journal of Sports Medicine, Vol. 25, No. 6, 1997, p. 751-754.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cameron, Michelle ; Buchgraber, Andreas ; Passler, Hans ; Vogt, Molly ; Thonar, Eugene ; Fu, Freddie ; Evans, Christopher H. / The natural history of the anterior cruciate ligament-deficient knee. Changes in synovial fluid cytokine and keratan sulfate concentrations. In: American Journal of Sports Medicine. 1997 ; Vol. 25, No. 6. pp. 751-754.
@article{11335ced017b48a3b033c5f71f69f58e,
title = "The natural history of the anterior cruciate ligament-deficient knee. Changes in synovial fluid cytokine and keratan sulfate concentrations",
abstract = "Restoring knee stability through reconstruction, while providing symptomatic relief, has not been shown tO decrease the incidence of degenerative changes after rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament. This suggests that posttraumatic osteoarthritis may not be purely biomechanical in origin, but also biochemical. To test this, we measured the levels of seven cytokine modulators of cartilage metabolism in knee joint synovial fluid after anterior cruciate ligament rupture. We also measured keratan sulfate, a product of articular cartilage catabolism. The sample population consisted of patients with uninjured knee joints (N = 10), and patients with acute (N = 60), subacute (N = 18), and chronic (N = 8) anterior cruciate ligament- deficient knees. Synovial fluid samples were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Normal synovial fluids contained high levels of the interleukin-1 receptor antagonist but low concentrations of other cytokines. Immediately after ligament rupture there were large increases in interleukins 6 and 8, tumor necrosis factor α, and keratan sulfate. Interleukin-1 levels remained low throughout the course. As the injury became subacute and then chronic, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, and keratan sulfate levels fell but remained considerably elevated 3 months after injury. Concentrations of interleukin-1Ra fell dramatically. Granulocyte-macrophage colony- stimulating factor concentrations were normal acutely and subacutely but by 3 months after injury were elevated 10-fold. Our data reveal a persistent and evolving disturbance in cytokine and keratan sulfate profiles within the anterior cruciate ligament-deficient knee, suggesting an important biochemical dimension to the development of osteoarthritis there.",
author = "Michelle Cameron and Andreas Buchgraber and Hans Passler and Molly Vogt and Eugene Thonar and Freddie Fu and Evans, {Christopher H}",
year = "1997",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "25",
pages = "751--754",
journal = "American Journal of Sports Medicine",
issn = "0363-5465",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The natural history of the anterior cruciate ligament-deficient knee. Changes in synovial fluid cytokine and keratan sulfate concentrations

AU - Cameron, Michelle

AU - Buchgraber, Andreas

AU - Passler, Hans

AU - Vogt, Molly

AU - Thonar, Eugene

AU - Fu, Freddie

AU - Evans, Christopher H

PY - 1997

Y1 - 1997

N2 - Restoring knee stability through reconstruction, while providing symptomatic relief, has not been shown tO decrease the incidence of degenerative changes after rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament. This suggests that posttraumatic osteoarthritis may not be purely biomechanical in origin, but also biochemical. To test this, we measured the levels of seven cytokine modulators of cartilage metabolism in knee joint synovial fluid after anterior cruciate ligament rupture. We also measured keratan sulfate, a product of articular cartilage catabolism. The sample population consisted of patients with uninjured knee joints (N = 10), and patients with acute (N = 60), subacute (N = 18), and chronic (N = 8) anterior cruciate ligament- deficient knees. Synovial fluid samples were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Normal synovial fluids contained high levels of the interleukin-1 receptor antagonist but low concentrations of other cytokines. Immediately after ligament rupture there were large increases in interleukins 6 and 8, tumor necrosis factor α, and keratan sulfate. Interleukin-1 levels remained low throughout the course. As the injury became subacute and then chronic, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, and keratan sulfate levels fell but remained considerably elevated 3 months after injury. Concentrations of interleukin-1Ra fell dramatically. Granulocyte-macrophage colony- stimulating factor concentrations were normal acutely and subacutely but by 3 months after injury were elevated 10-fold. Our data reveal a persistent and evolving disturbance in cytokine and keratan sulfate profiles within the anterior cruciate ligament-deficient knee, suggesting an important biochemical dimension to the development of osteoarthritis there.

AB - Restoring knee stability through reconstruction, while providing symptomatic relief, has not been shown tO decrease the incidence of degenerative changes after rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament. This suggests that posttraumatic osteoarthritis may not be purely biomechanical in origin, but also biochemical. To test this, we measured the levels of seven cytokine modulators of cartilage metabolism in knee joint synovial fluid after anterior cruciate ligament rupture. We also measured keratan sulfate, a product of articular cartilage catabolism. The sample population consisted of patients with uninjured knee joints (N = 10), and patients with acute (N = 60), subacute (N = 18), and chronic (N = 8) anterior cruciate ligament- deficient knees. Synovial fluid samples were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Normal synovial fluids contained high levels of the interleukin-1 receptor antagonist but low concentrations of other cytokines. Immediately after ligament rupture there were large increases in interleukins 6 and 8, tumor necrosis factor α, and keratan sulfate. Interleukin-1 levels remained low throughout the course. As the injury became subacute and then chronic, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, and keratan sulfate levels fell but remained considerably elevated 3 months after injury. Concentrations of interleukin-1Ra fell dramatically. Granulocyte-macrophage colony- stimulating factor concentrations were normal acutely and subacutely but by 3 months after injury were elevated 10-fold. Our data reveal a persistent and evolving disturbance in cytokine and keratan sulfate profiles within the anterior cruciate ligament-deficient knee, suggesting an important biochemical dimension to the development of osteoarthritis there.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0030726191&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0030726191&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 9397261

AN - SCOPUS:0030726191

VL - 25

SP - 751

EP - 754

JO - American Journal of Sports Medicine

JF - American Journal of Sports Medicine

SN - 0363-5465

IS - 6

ER -