The morbidity and mortality of reoperation of coronary artery disease and analysis of late results with use of actuarial estimate of event-free interval

Hartzell V Schaff, T. A. Orszulak, B. J. Gersh, J. M. Piehler, F. J. Puga, G. K. Danielson, J. R. Pluth

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Abstract

To determine late survival and functional status after second revascularization procedures for coronary artery disease, we studied 106 consecutive patients operated on between June, 1969, and December, 1980. The mean age of the 96 men and 10 women was 49 ± 8 years (range 22 to 65 years). Before reoperation, 101 patients (95%) were judged to be in New York Heart Association Class III or IV with angina, and 81 patients (76%) had three-vessel involvement. Angina recurrence was most commonly caused by bypass graft occlusion alone and in combination with progressive disease of the native arteries (60 patients, 57%). Three patients (2.8%) died within 30 days of reoperation; each death resulted from myocardial infarction. An average of 2.2 coronary arteries were bypassed in each patient. Complete follow-up data (mean 43 months) were available for 105 patients. Actuarial survival of patients dismissed alive is 94% at 5 years and 89% at 7 years. All late cardiac-releated deaths occurred in patients with three-vessel disease. When recurrence of any angina, need for a third operation, and myocardial infarction are included with cardiac-related deaths, event-free survival is 28% at 5 years and 26% at 7 years. Late survival deaths and functional status could not be predicted by the cause of recurrent angina or the presence of risk factors. Repeat myocardial revascularization can apparently be undertaken with low risk and with prospects for excellent long-term survival. After reoperation, recurrence of mild angina is not uncommon, but freedom from serious cardiac events and relief of severe symptoms were noted in more than 60% of patients 5 years later.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)508-515
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery
Volume85
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1983

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Reoperation
Coronary Artery Disease
Morbidity
Mortality
Survival
Recurrence
Myocardial Infarction
Myocardial Revascularization
Disease-Free Survival
Coronary Vessels
Arteries
Transplants

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Surgery

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The morbidity and mortality of reoperation of coronary artery disease and analysis of late results with use of actuarial estimate of event-free interval. / Schaff, Hartzell V; Orszulak, T. A.; Gersh, B. J.; Piehler, J. M.; Puga, F. J.; Danielson, G. K.; Pluth, J. R.

In: Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Vol. 85, No. 4, 1983, p. 508-515.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Schaff, Hartzell V ; Orszulak, T. A. ; Gersh, B. J. ; Piehler, J. M. ; Puga, F. J. ; Danielson, G. K. ; Pluth, J. R. / The morbidity and mortality of reoperation of coronary artery disease and analysis of late results with use of actuarial estimate of event-free interval. In: Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery. 1983 ; Vol. 85, No. 4. pp. 508-515.
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