The molecular etiology of breast cancer: Evidence from biomarkers of risk

Nilesh W. Gaikwad, Li Yang, Paola Muti, Jane L. Meza, Sandhya Pruthi, James N. Ingle, Eleanor G. Rogan, Ercole L. Cavalieri

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

98 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Estrogens can become endogenous carcinogens via formation of catechol estrogen quinones, which react with DNA to form specific depurinating estrogen-DNA adducts. The mutations resulting from these adducts can lead to cell transformation and the initiation of breast cancer. Estrogen metabolites, conjugates and depurinating DNA adducts in urine samples from 46 healthy control women, 12 high-risk women and 17 women with breast cancer were analyzed. The estrogen metabolites, conjugates and depurinating DNA adducts were identified and quantified by using ultraperformance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. The levels of the ratios of depurinating DNA adducts to their respective estrogen metabolites and conjugates were significantly higher in high-risk women (p < 0.001) and women with breast cancer (p < 0.001) than in control subjects. The high-risk and breast cancer groups were not significantly different (p = 0.62). After adjusting for patient characteristics, these ratios were still significantly associated with health status. Thus, the depurinating estrogen-DNA adducts are possible biomarkers for early detection of breast cancer risk and response to preventive treatment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1949-1957
Number of pages9
JournalInternational Journal of Cancer
Volume122
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2008

Fingerprint

Tumor Biomarkers
DNA Adducts
Estrogens
Breast Neoplasms
Catechol Estrogens
Quinones
Tandem Mass Spectrometry
Early Detection of Cancer
Liquid Chromatography
Carcinogens
Health Status
Biomarkers
Urine
Mutation
DNA

Keywords

  • Balance in estrogen metabolism
  • Breast cancer risk
  • Depurinating estrogen-dna adducts
  • Estrogen biomarkers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Gaikwad, N. W., Yang, L., Muti, P., Meza, J. L., Pruthi, S., Ingle, J. N., ... Cavalieri, E. L. (2008). The molecular etiology of breast cancer: Evidence from biomarkers of risk. International Journal of Cancer, 122(9), 1949-1957. https://doi.org/10.1002/ijc.23329

The molecular etiology of breast cancer : Evidence from biomarkers of risk. / Gaikwad, Nilesh W.; Yang, Li; Muti, Paola; Meza, Jane L.; Pruthi, Sandhya; Ingle, James N.; Rogan, Eleanor G.; Cavalieri, Ercole L.

In: International Journal of Cancer, Vol. 122, No. 9, 01.05.2008, p. 1949-1957.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gaikwad, NW, Yang, L, Muti, P, Meza, JL, Pruthi, S, Ingle, JN, Rogan, EG & Cavalieri, EL 2008, 'The molecular etiology of breast cancer: Evidence from biomarkers of risk', International Journal of Cancer, vol. 122, no. 9, pp. 1949-1957. https://doi.org/10.1002/ijc.23329
Gaikwad, Nilesh W. ; Yang, Li ; Muti, Paola ; Meza, Jane L. ; Pruthi, Sandhya ; Ingle, James N. ; Rogan, Eleanor G. ; Cavalieri, Ercole L. / The molecular etiology of breast cancer : Evidence from biomarkers of risk. In: International Journal of Cancer. 2008 ; Vol. 122, No. 9. pp. 1949-1957.
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