The joint effect of bias awareness and self-reported prejudice on intergroup anxiety and intentions for intergroup contact

Sylvia P. Perry, John F. Dovidio, Mary C. Murphy, Michelle Van Ryn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Two correlational studies investigated the joint effect of bias awareness-a new individual difference measure that assesses Whites' awareness and concern about their propensity to be biased-and prejudice on Whites' intergroup anxiety and intended intergroup contact. Using a community sample (Study 1), we found the predicted Bias Awareness × Prejudice interaction. Prejudice was more strongly related to interracial anxiety among those high (vs. low) in bias awareness. Study 2 investigated potential behavioral consequences in an important real world context: medical students' intentions for working primarily with minority patients. Study 2 replicated the Bias Awareness × Prejudice interaction and further demonstrated that interracial anxiety mediated medical students' intentions to work with minority populations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)89-96
Number of pages8
JournalCultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology
Volume21
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015

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Keywords

  • Bias awareness
  • Intergroup anxiety
  • Interracial contact
  • Self-knowledge

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

The joint effect of bias awareness and self-reported prejudice on intergroup anxiety and intentions for intergroup contact. / Perry, Sylvia P.; Dovidio, John F.; Murphy, Mary C.; Van Ryn, Michelle.

In: Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology, Vol. 21, No. 1, 2015, p. 89-96.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Perry, Sylvia P. ; Dovidio, John F. ; Murphy, Mary C. ; Van Ryn, Michelle. / The joint effect of bias awareness and self-reported prejudice on intergroup anxiety and intentions for intergroup contact. In: Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology. 2015 ; Vol. 21, No. 1. pp. 89-96.
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