The isolated perfused rat liver: Conceptual and practical considerations

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Abstract

Although it has been over 100 years since Claude Bernard first reported the use of the isolated perfused rat liver (IPRL), this model is still a valuable and commonly used tool for exploring the physiology and pathophysiology of the liver. Indeed, the IPRL remains an important experimental model despite the availability of newer techniques (e.g., liver slices, isolated and cultured cells, and isolated organelles) for evaluating hepatic function. This popularity is due to the fact that, in contrast to in vivo models, such as the bile fistula rat, the IPRL allows repeated sampling of the perfusate, permits easy exposure of the liver to different concentrations of test substances and is amenable to alterations in temperature that would not be tolerated in vivo. Furthermore, experiments can be done independent of the influence of other organ systems, plasma constituents and neural-hormonal effects. In contrast to other in vitro models, such as isolated and cultured hepatocytes and isolated organelles, hepatic architecture, cell polarity and bile flow are preserved in the IPRL. Given these considerations, it seems timely to update and, in a selective manner, to review the IPRL, especially as it relates to the study of hepatic function, the advantages and disadvantages of different technical aspects of the model and the problem of reliably assessing organ viability. This manuscript is intended not only to help the reader establish this model, but also to allow him to choose those conditions which best fit his particular needs. In addition, it will provide sufficient conceptual information to permit the reader to critically evaluate work with the IPRL. However, the manuscript is not meant to be a comprehensive technical review, as these are readily available. Rather, it is a highly selective update focusing on concepts, practical considerations and applications.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)511-517
Number of pages7
JournalHepatology
Volume6
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1986

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Liver
Bile
Organelles
Hepatocytes
Tissue Survival
Cell Polarity
Manuscripts
Fistula
Cultured Cells
Theoretical Models
Temperature

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hepatology

Cite this

The isolated perfused rat liver : Conceptual and practical considerations. / Gores, Gregory James; Kost, L. J.; La Russo, Nicholas F.

In: Hepatology, Vol. 6, No. 3, 1986, p. 511-517.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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