The influence of surgery on the natural history of angiographically documented left ventricular aneurysm: The Coronary Artery Surgery Study

D. P. Faxon, W. O. Myers, C. H. McCabe, K. B. Davis, H. V. Schaff, J. W. Wilson, T. J. Ryan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Scopus citations

Abstract

Coronary artery bypass surgery with or without aneurysmectomy has been used to treat patients with angiographically defined left ventricular aneurysm. To evaluate whether surgery benefits such patients, we analyzed the data from 1131 patients who were enrolled in the registry of the Coronary Artery Surgery Study. Four hundred sixty-seven patients underwent bypass surgery, of whom 238 also had left ventricular resection, and 30 had resection alone. The overall operative mortality was 7.9%; the operative mortality was 7% for bypass alone compared with 9% for bypass surgery plus left ventricular resection (NS). Long-term survival by life-table analysis was similar for both medically and surgically treated patients (69% vs 67%, respectively). Cox survival analysis identified congestive heart failure score, duration of chest pain, extent of coronary disease, left ventricular end-diastolic pressure, age, and surgical therapy as important predictors of outcome. Patient subsets that showed improved survival with surgical therapy after adjustment for inequities in baseline characteristics were patients with three-vessel disease and those patients in moderate- and high-risk subgroups. Surgical therapy significantly reduced symptoms of angina and use of cardiac medications but the incidence of recurrent infarction was similar for both therapies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)110-118
Number of pages9
JournalCirculation
Volume74
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1986

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Physiology (medical)

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