The influence of sex and obesity phenotype on meal fatty acid metabolism before and after weight loss

Sylvia Santosa, Donald D. Hensrud, Susanne B. Votruba, Michael Dennis Jensen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

37 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Regional differences in meal fat storage may explain the preservation of fat accumulation in obese persons. Objective: The objective was to determine whether meal fatty acid (FA) metabolism differs by sex and obesity phenotypes before and after weight loss. Design: A [3H]triolein- containing meal was given to trace meal FA oxidation (3H2O generation) and adipose tissue uptake (abdominal subcutaneous and gluteal biopsy samples) in 13 upperbody obese (UOb) men, 9 UOb women, and 8 lower-body obese (LOb) women (study 1). Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and abdominal computed tomography were used to measure fat distribution. The subjects participated in a diet and exercise weightloss program, after which 23 subjects returned for an identical study (study 2). Results: In study 1, the storage of meal FA (mg meal fat/g adipose lipid) was greater in gluteal than in abdominal fat (P = 0.022) in LOb women, but not in UOb women or UOb men. UOb men stored a lesser percentage of meal FAs in both upper- and lower-body subcutaneous fat than did the LOb and UOb women (P = 0.001 and P = 0.044, respectively). The participants who returned for study 2 had lost 14.1 ± 1.1 kg. Changes in the uptake of meal FAs followed a pattern indicative of obesity phenotype maintenance by group. The uptake of meal FAs increased in upper-body subcutaneous fat (P = 0.028) in weight-reduced UOb women and UOb men (P = 0.046) and decreased in lower-body fat (P = 0.025) in UOb men. Conclusion: The differences in meal FA trafficking by obesity phenotype suggest that meal FA storage may play a role in regulating body fat distribution in obese persons.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1134-1141
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume88
Issue number4
StatePublished - Oct 1 2008

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Meals
Weight Loss
Fatty Acids
Obesity
Phenotype
Fats
Subcutaneous Fat
Abdominal Subcutaneous Fat
Triolein
Body Fat Distribution
Abdominal Fat
Photon Absorptiometry
Adipose Tissue
Tomography
Maintenance
Exercise
Diet
Lipids
Biopsy
Weights and Measures

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

The influence of sex and obesity phenotype on meal fatty acid metabolism before and after weight loss. / Santosa, Sylvia; Hensrud, Donald D.; Votruba, Susanne B.; Jensen, Michael Dennis.

In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 88, No. 4, 01.10.2008, p. 1134-1141.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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