The Incidence of and Risk Factors for Postintubation Hypotension in the Immunocompromised Critically Ill Adult

Nathan Smischney, Mohamed O. Seisa, John Cambest, Robert A. Wiegand, Kyle D. Busack, Theodore O. Loftsgard, Darrell R. Schroeder, Daniel A. Diedrich

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives: Our primary aim was to ascertain the frequency of postintubation hypotension in immunocompromised critically ill adults with secondary aims of arriving at potential risk factors for the development of postintubation hypotension and its impact on patient-related outcomes. Methods: Critically ill adult patients (≥18 years) were included from January 1, 2010, to December 31, 2014. We defined immunocompromised as patients with any solid organ or nonsolid organ malignancy or transplant, whether solid organ or not, requiring current chemotherapy. Postintubation hypotension was defined as a decrease in systolic blood pressure to less than 90 mm Hg or a decrease in mean arterial pressure to less than 65 mm Hg or the initiation of any vasopressor medication. Patients were then stratified based on development of postintubation hypotension. Potential risk factors and intensive care unit (ICU) outcome metrics were electronically captured by a validated data mart system. Results: The final cohort included 269 patients. Postintubation hypotension occurred in 141 (52%; 95% confidence interval: 46-58) patients. Several risk factors predicted postintubation hypotension on univariate analysis; however, only Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation III score in the first 24 hours, preintubation shock status, and preintubation hemodynamic instability remained significant on all 4 multivariate analyses. Patients developing postintubation hypotension had higher ICU and hospital mortality (54 [38%] vs 31 [24%], P =.01; 69 [49%] vs 47 [37%], P =.04). Conclusion: Based on previous literature, we found a higher frequency of postintubation hypotension in the immunocompromised than in the nonimmunocompromised critically ill adult patients. Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation III score in the first 24 hours, preintubation shock status, and preintubation hemodynamic instability were significant predictors on multivariate analyses. Postintubation hypotension led to higher ICU and hospital mortality in those experiencing this complication.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)578-586
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Intensive Care Medicine
Volume34
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2019

Keywords

  • critically ill
  • hemodynamics
  • immunocompromised
  • intensive care unit
  • intubation
  • postintubation hypotension

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

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    Smischney, N., Seisa, M. O., Cambest, J., Wiegand, R. A., Busack, K. D., Loftsgard, T. O., Schroeder, D. R., & Diedrich, D. A. (2019). The Incidence of and Risk Factors for Postintubation Hypotension in the Immunocompromised Critically Ill Adult. Journal of Intensive Care Medicine, 34(7), 578-586. https://doi.org/10.1177/0885066617704844