The impact of staphylococcus aureus -associated molecular patterns on staphylococcal superantigen-induced toxic shock syndrome and pneumonia

Ashenafi Y. Tilahun, Melissa Karau, Alessandro Ballard, Miluka P. Gunaratna, Anusa Thapa, Chella S. David, Robin Patel, Govindarajan Rajagopalan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Staphylococcus aureus is capable of causing a spectrum of human illnesses. During serious S. aureus infections, the staphylococcal pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) such as peptidoglycan, lipoteichoic acid, and lipoproteins and even intact S. aureus, are believed to act in conjunction with the staphylococcal superantigens (SSAg) to activate the innate and adaptive immune system, respectively, and cause immunopathology. However, recent studies have shown that staphylococcal PAMPs could suppress inflammation by several mechanisms and protect from staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome, a life-threatening systemic disease caused by toxigenic S. aureus. Given the contradictory pro- and anti-inflammatory roles of staphylococcal PAMPs, we examined the effects of S. aureus-derived molecular patterns on immune responses driven by SSAg in vivo using HLA-DR3 and HLA-DQ8 transgenic mice. Our study showed that neither S. aureus-derived peptidoglycans (PGN), lipoteichoic acid (LTA), nor heat-killed Staphylococcus aureus (HKSA) inhibited SSAg-induced T cell proliferation in vitro. They failed to antagonize the immunostimulatory effects of SSAg in vivo as determined by their inability to attenuate systemic cytokine/chemokine response and reduce SSAg-induced T cell expansion. These staphylococcal PAMPs also failed to protect HLA-DR3 as well as HLA-DQ8 transgenic mice from either SSAg-induced toxic shock or pneumonia induced by a SSAg-producing strain of S. aureus.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number468285
JournalMediators of Inflammation
Volume2014
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Cell Biology

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