The impact of race as a risk factor for symptom severity and age at diagnosis of uterine leiomyomata among affected sisters

Karen L. Huyck, Carolien I M Panhuysen, Karen T. Cuenco, Jingmei Zhang, Hilary Goldhammer, Emlyn S. Jones, Priya Somasundaram, Allison M. Lynch, Bernard L. Harlow, Hang Lee, Elizabeth A Stewart, Cynthia C. Morton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

65 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The objective of the study was to identify risk factors for uterine leiomyomata (UL) in a racially diverse population of women with a family history of UL, and to evaluate their contribution to disease severity and age at diagnosis. Study Design: We collected and analyzed epidemiologic data from 285 sister pairs diagnosed with UL. Risk factors for UL-related outcomes were compared among black (n = 73) and white (n = 212) sister pairs using univariate and multivariate regression models. Results: Black women reported an average age at diagnosis of 5.3 years younger (SE, 1.1; P < .001) and were more likely to report severe disease (odds ratio, 5.22; 95% confidence interval, 1.99-13.7, P < .001) than white women of similar socioeconomic status. Conclusion: Self-reported race is a significant factor in the severity of UL among women with a family history of UL. Differences in disease presentation between races likely reflect underlying genetic heterogeneity. The affected sister-pair study design can address both epidemiological and genetic hypotheses about UL.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume198
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2008
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Leiomyoma
Siblings
Genetic Heterogeneity
Social Class
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Population

Keywords

  • family study
  • fibroids
  • racial differences
  • symptom severity
  • uterine leiomyomata

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

The impact of race as a risk factor for symptom severity and age at diagnosis of uterine leiomyomata among affected sisters. / Huyck, Karen L.; Panhuysen, Carolien I M; Cuenco, Karen T.; Zhang, Jingmei; Goldhammer, Hilary; Jones, Emlyn S.; Somasundaram, Priya; Lynch, Allison M.; Harlow, Bernard L.; Lee, Hang; Stewart, Elizabeth A; Morton, Cynthia C.

In: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vol. 198, No. 2, 02.2008.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Huyck, KL, Panhuysen, CIM, Cuenco, KT, Zhang, J, Goldhammer, H, Jones, ES, Somasundaram, P, Lynch, AM, Harlow, BL, Lee, H, Stewart, EA & Morton, CC 2008, 'The impact of race as a risk factor for symptom severity and age at diagnosis of uterine leiomyomata among affected sisters', American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, vol. 198, no. 2. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajog.2007.05.038
Huyck, Karen L. ; Panhuysen, Carolien I M ; Cuenco, Karen T. ; Zhang, Jingmei ; Goldhammer, Hilary ; Jones, Emlyn S. ; Somasundaram, Priya ; Lynch, Allison M. ; Harlow, Bernard L. ; Lee, Hang ; Stewart, Elizabeth A ; Morton, Cynthia C. / The impact of race as a risk factor for symptom severity and age at diagnosis of uterine leiomyomata among affected sisters. In: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 2008 ; Vol. 198, No. 2.
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