The impact of diabetes and obesity on liver histology in patients with hapatitis C

Frank Friedenberg, Surakit Pungpapong, N. Zaeri, L. E. Braitman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aim: An association between diabetes mellitus and HCV has been recognized previously. No study has examined whether there is an independent association between the degree of hepatic fibrosis and the incidence of diabetes in HCV patients when controlling for other risk factors. Methods: We reviewed the charts of 264 consecutive patients with chronic HCV infection at a referral liver centre from January 1991 to December 1999. Demographic background, medical history, laboratory and liver biopsy results were retrieved. Results: The prevalence of diabetes was 16.3%. Gender, intravenous drug use, steatosis scores, aminotransferase levels and iron studies were similarly distributed in patients with and without diabetes (all p > 0.05). In contrast, mean age was greater in the diabetic group (49.8 vs. 44.3, p = 0.003). The prevalence of diabetes was substantially higher in African-Americans (p = 0.001) and those with BMI > 30 (p = 0.015). Although the fibrosis score was higher in diabetics (ρ = 0.14, p = 0.03), that association did not remain significant when controlling for diabetes risk factors (p > 0.3). The degree of steatosis and fibrosis both tended to increase with increasing BMI (ρ = 0.47, p < 0.001 and ρ = 0.13, p = 0.03, respectively). Even after controlling for diabetes, age, gender, race, and current alcohol use, those associations remained (both p < 0.001). Conclusions: The prevalence of diabetes in our group of HCV patients was high, consistent with other studies. Diabetes is not an independent predictor of degree of fibrosis. Body mass index is an independent predictor of both fibrosis and steatosis in HCV patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)150-155
Number of pages6
JournalDiabetes, Obesity and Metabolism
Volume5
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2003
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Histology
Fibrosis
Obesity
Liver
Transaminases
African Americans
Diabetes Mellitus
Body Mass Index
Referral and Consultation
Iron
Alcohols
Demography
Biopsy
Incidence
Infection
Pharmaceutical Preparations

Keywords

  • BMI
  • Diabetes
  • Hepatitis C
  • Liver fibrosis
  • Steatosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

The impact of diabetes and obesity on liver histology in patients with hapatitis C. / Friedenberg, Frank; Pungpapong, Surakit; Zaeri, N.; Braitman, L. E.

In: Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism, Vol. 5, No. 3, 01.05.2003, p. 150-155.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Friedenberg, Frank ; Pungpapong, Surakit ; Zaeri, N. ; Braitman, L. E. / The impact of diabetes and obesity on liver histology in patients with hapatitis C. In: Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism. 2003 ; Vol. 5, No. 3. pp. 150-155.
@article{4b0e993f15c1455aa652eec02d4d6706,
title = "The impact of diabetes and obesity on liver histology in patients with hapatitis C",
abstract = "Aim: An association between diabetes mellitus and HCV has been recognized previously. No study has examined whether there is an independent association between the degree of hepatic fibrosis and the incidence of diabetes in HCV patients when controlling for other risk factors. Methods: We reviewed the charts of 264 consecutive patients with chronic HCV infection at a referral liver centre from January 1991 to December 1999. Demographic background, medical history, laboratory and liver biopsy results were retrieved. Results: The prevalence of diabetes was 16.3{\%}. Gender, intravenous drug use, steatosis scores, aminotransferase levels and iron studies were similarly distributed in patients with and without diabetes (all p > 0.05). In contrast, mean age was greater in the diabetic group (49.8 vs. 44.3, p = 0.003). The prevalence of diabetes was substantially higher in African-Americans (p = 0.001) and those with BMI > 30 (p = 0.015). Although the fibrosis score was higher in diabetics (ρ = 0.14, p = 0.03), that association did not remain significant when controlling for diabetes risk factors (p > 0.3). The degree of steatosis and fibrosis both tended to increase with increasing BMI (ρ = 0.47, p < 0.001 and ρ = 0.13, p = 0.03, respectively). Even after controlling for diabetes, age, gender, race, and current alcohol use, those associations remained (both p < 0.001). Conclusions: The prevalence of diabetes in our group of HCV patients was high, consistent with other studies. Diabetes is not an independent predictor of degree of fibrosis. Body mass index is an independent predictor of both fibrosis and steatosis in HCV patients.",
keywords = "BMI, Diabetes, Hepatitis C, Liver fibrosis, Steatosis",
author = "Frank Friedenberg and Surakit Pungpapong and N. Zaeri and Braitman, {L. E.}",
year = "2003",
month = "5",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1046/j.1463-1326.2003.00256.x",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "5",
pages = "150--155",
journal = "Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism",
issn = "1462-8902",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The impact of diabetes and obesity on liver histology in patients with hapatitis C

AU - Friedenberg, Frank

AU - Pungpapong, Surakit

AU - Zaeri, N.

AU - Braitman, L. E.

PY - 2003/5/1

Y1 - 2003/5/1

N2 - Aim: An association between diabetes mellitus and HCV has been recognized previously. No study has examined whether there is an independent association between the degree of hepatic fibrosis and the incidence of diabetes in HCV patients when controlling for other risk factors. Methods: We reviewed the charts of 264 consecutive patients with chronic HCV infection at a referral liver centre from January 1991 to December 1999. Demographic background, medical history, laboratory and liver biopsy results were retrieved. Results: The prevalence of diabetes was 16.3%. Gender, intravenous drug use, steatosis scores, aminotransferase levels and iron studies were similarly distributed in patients with and without diabetes (all p > 0.05). In contrast, mean age was greater in the diabetic group (49.8 vs. 44.3, p = 0.003). The prevalence of diabetes was substantially higher in African-Americans (p = 0.001) and those with BMI > 30 (p = 0.015). Although the fibrosis score was higher in diabetics (ρ = 0.14, p = 0.03), that association did not remain significant when controlling for diabetes risk factors (p > 0.3). The degree of steatosis and fibrosis both tended to increase with increasing BMI (ρ = 0.47, p < 0.001 and ρ = 0.13, p = 0.03, respectively). Even after controlling for diabetes, age, gender, race, and current alcohol use, those associations remained (both p < 0.001). Conclusions: The prevalence of diabetes in our group of HCV patients was high, consistent with other studies. Diabetes is not an independent predictor of degree of fibrosis. Body mass index is an independent predictor of both fibrosis and steatosis in HCV patients.

AB - Aim: An association between diabetes mellitus and HCV has been recognized previously. No study has examined whether there is an independent association between the degree of hepatic fibrosis and the incidence of diabetes in HCV patients when controlling for other risk factors. Methods: We reviewed the charts of 264 consecutive patients with chronic HCV infection at a referral liver centre from January 1991 to December 1999. Demographic background, medical history, laboratory and liver biopsy results were retrieved. Results: The prevalence of diabetes was 16.3%. Gender, intravenous drug use, steatosis scores, aminotransferase levels and iron studies were similarly distributed in patients with and without diabetes (all p > 0.05). In contrast, mean age was greater in the diabetic group (49.8 vs. 44.3, p = 0.003). The prevalence of diabetes was substantially higher in African-Americans (p = 0.001) and those with BMI > 30 (p = 0.015). Although the fibrosis score was higher in diabetics (ρ = 0.14, p = 0.03), that association did not remain significant when controlling for diabetes risk factors (p > 0.3). The degree of steatosis and fibrosis both tended to increase with increasing BMI (ρ = 0.47, p < 0.001 and ρ = 0.13, p = 0.03, respectively). Even after controlling for diabetes, age, gender, race, and current alcohol use, those associations remained (both p < 0.001). Conclusions: The prevalence of diabetes in our group of HCV patients was high, consistent with other studies. Diabetes is not an independent predictor of degree of fibrosis. Body mass index is an independent predictor of both fibrosis and steatosis in HCV patients.

KW - BMI

KW - Diabetes

KW - Hepatitis C

KW - Liver fibrosis

KW - Steatosis

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0037407378&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0037407378&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1046/j.1463-1326.2003.00256.x

DO - 10.1046/j.1463-1326.2003.00256.x

M3 - Article

VL - 5

SP - 150

EP - 155

JO - Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism

JF - Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism

SN - 1462-8902

IS - 3

ER -