The functional and financial impact of isolated and recurrent dislocation after total hip arthroplasty

M. P. Abdel, M. B. Cross, A. T. Yasen, F. S. Haddad

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

The aims of this study were to determine the functional impact and financial burden of isolated and recurrent dislocation after total hip arthroplasty (THA). Our secondary goal was to determine whether there was a difference between patients who were treated nonoperatively and those who were treated operatively. We retrospectively reviewed 71 patients who had suffered dislocation of a primary THA. Their mean age was 67 years (41 to 92) and the mean follow-up was 3.8 years (2.1 to 8.2). Because patients with recurrent dislocation were three times more likely to undergo operative treatment (p < 0.0001), they ultimately had a significantly higher mean Harris Hip Score (HHS) (p = 0.0001), lower mean Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC) scores (p = 0.001) and a higher mean SF-12 score (p < 0.0001) than patients with a single dislocation. Likewise, those who underwent operative treatment had a higher mean HHS (p < 0.0001), lower mean WOMAC score (p < 0.0001) and a higher mean SF-12 score (p < 0.0001) than those who were treated non-operatively. Recurrent dislocation and operative treatment increased costs by 300% (£11 456; p < 0.0001) and 40% (£5217; p < 0.0001), respectively. The operative treatment of recurrent dislocation results in significantly better function than non-operative management. Moreover, the increase in costs for operative treatment is modest compared with that of non-operative measures.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1046-1049
Number of pages4
JournalBone and Joint Journal
Volume97-B
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2015

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

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