The epidemiology of pediatric basketball injuries presenting to us emergency departments

2000-2006

Evangelos Pappas, Bohdanna T. Zazulak, Ellen E. Yard, Timothy Hewett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: There is limited published research on the epidemiology of basketball injuries treated in US emergency departments (EDs). Hypothesis: Age and sex patterns exist for the most common pediatric basketball injuries treated in EDs. Study Design: Descriptive epidemiology study. Methods: Data from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System and the National Sporting Goods Association were used to calculate national injury incidence rates and 95% confidence intervals of pediatric basketball injuries. Results: An estimated 325 465 annual visits were made to US EDs for pediatric basketball-related injuries from 2000 to 2006. The 5 most common injuries were ankle sprains (21.7%), finger sprains (8.0%), finger fractures (7.8%), knee sprains (3.9%), and facial lacerations (3.9%). Among persons aged 12 to 17 years, girls had a higher rate of knee sprains than boys (P < 0.001), but this association did not exist among those aged 7 to 11 years (P = 0.27). Boys had a higher rate of facial lacerations than girls (P < 0.01). Among persons aged 12 to 17 years, girls had a higher rate of finger sprains (P < 0.01). For both boys and girls, the rate of the 5 most common basketball injuries was higher among those aged 12 to 17 years compared with those aged 7 to 11 years (P < 0.01). Conclusions: The annual number of basketball-related pediatric ED visits approaches a third of a million and demonstrates the extent of the public health problem that injuries in this sport pose. Distinct sex and age patterns were observed. Clinical Relevance: The study findings provide important information on basketball injury rates that may be used for targeting prevention interventions by sex and age group.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)331-335
Number of pages5
JournalSports Health
Volume3
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2011
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Basketball
Hospital Emergency Service
Epidemiology
Pediatrics
Sprains and Strains
Wounds and Injuries
Fingers
Lacerations
Knee
Ankle Injuries
Athletic Injuries
Public Health
Age Groups
Confidence Intervals

Keywords

  • Athletic injuries
  • Emergency department
  • Epidemiology
  • Finger injuries
  • Sprains

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

The epidemiology of pediatric basketball injuries presenting to us emergency departments : 2000-2006. / Pappas, Evangelos; Zazulak, Bohdanna T.; Yard, Ellen E.; Hewett, Timothy.

In: Sports Health, Vol. 3, No. 4, 07.2011, p. 331-335.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pappas, Evangelos ; Zazulak, Bohdanna T. ; Yard, Ellen E. ; Hewett, Timothy. / The epidemiology of pediatric basketball injuries presenting to us emergency departments : 2000-2006. In: Sports Health. 2011 ; Vol. 3, No. 4. pp. 331-335.
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