The electricidal effect is active in an experimental model of Staphylococcus epidermidis chronic foreign body osteomyelitis

Jose L. Del Pozo, Mark S. Rouse, Gorane Euba, Cheol In Kang, Jayawant Mandrekar, James M. Steckelberg, Robin Patel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Treatment with low-amperage (200 μA) electrical current was compared to intravenous doxycycline treatment or no treatment in a rabbit model of Staphylococcus epidermidis chronic foreign body osteomyelitis to determine if the electricidal effect is active in vivo. A stainless steel implant and 10 4 CFU of planktonic S. epidermidis were placed into the medullary cavity of the tibia. Four weeks later, rabbits were assigned to one of three groups with treatment administered for 21 days. The groups included those receiving no treatment (n = 10), intravenous doxycycline (n = 14; 8 mg/kg of body weight three times per day), and electrical current (n = 15; 200 μA continuous delivery). Following treatment, rabbits were sacrificed and the tibias quantitatively cultured. Bacterial load was significantly reduced in the doxycycline (median, 2.55 [range, 0.50 to 6.13] log10 CFU/g of bone) and electrical-current (median, 1.09 [range, 0.50 to 2.99] log10 CFU/g of bone) groups, compared to the level for the control group (median, 4.16 [range, 3.70 to 5.66] log10 CFU/g of bone) (P < 0.0001). Moreover, treatment with electrical current was statistically significantly more efficacious (P = 0.035) than doxycycline treatment. The electricidal effect (the bactericidal activity of low-amperage electrical current against bacterial biofilms) is active in vivo in the treatment of experimental S. epidermidis chronic foreign body osteomyelitis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)4064-4068
Number of pages5
JournalAntimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy
Volume53
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2009

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Staphylococcus epidermidis
Doxycycline
Osteomyelitis
Foreign Bodies
Theoretical Models
Rabbits
Tibia
Bone and Bones
Bacterial Load
Stainless Steel
Biofilms
Body Weight
Control Groups

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Pharmacology
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

The electricidal effect is active in an experimental model of Staphylococcus epidermidis chronic foreign body osteomyelitis. / Del Pozo, Jose L.; Rouse, Mark S.; Euba, Gorane; Kang, Cheol In; Mandrekar, Jayawant; Steckelberg, James M.; Patel, Robin.

In: Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, Vol. 53, No. 10, 10.2009, p. 4064-4068.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Del Pozo, Jose L. ; Rouse, Mark S. ; Euba, Gorane ; Kang, Cheol In ; Mandrekar, Jayawant ; Steckelberg, James M. ; Patel, Robin. / The electricidal effect is active in an experimental model of Staphylococcus epidermidis chronic foreign body osteomyelitis. In: Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy. 2009 ; Vol. 53, No. 10. pp. 4064-4068.
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