The effect of remote ischemic pre-conditioning on pulmonary vascular pressure and gas exchange in healthy humans during hypoxia

Chul Ho Kim, Pavol Sajgalik, Erik H. Van Iterson, Sae Young Jae, Bruce David Johnson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

This study investigated whether rIPC alters the typical changes in pulmonary arterial pressure, pulmonary gas exchange associated with exercise in hypoxia. Methods: 16 healthy adults were randomized to either rIPC treatment (n = 8) or control (n = 8). Afterward, subjects performed supine ergometry at constant load (30 W, 40˜50 rpm) for 25 min during hypoxia (12.5% O 2 ). Following a 90˜120 min rest, either rIPC or sham treatment was performed, which was then followed by post-assessment exercise. Throughout exercise, pulmonary arterial systolic pressure (PASP) and mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP) were measured via echocardiography, while pulmonary gas exchange was being assessed. Results: The rICP group demonstrated improved PASP and mPAP (p < 0.05), whereas the control group did not. Additionally, breathing efficiency (V E /V CO2 ) and end-tidal CO 2 (PET CO2 ) were improved in rIPC group (p < 0.05), but not in controls. Conclusion: These data suggest that rIPC contributes to reduced pulmonary arterial pressure, and improved pulmonary gas exchange during hypoxic exercise. However, follow-up studies are needed to apply these findings to patient care settings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)62-66
Number of pages5
JournalRespiratory Physiology and Neurobiology
Volume261
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2019

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Ischemic Preconditioning
Blood Vessels
Arterial Pressure
Gases
Pulmonary Gas Exchange
Pressure
Lung
Exercise
Blood Pressure
Ergometry
Carbon Monoxide
Echocardiography
Hypoxia
Patient Care
Respiration
Placebos
Control Groups

Keywords

  • Breathing efficiency
  • Low oxygen
  • Pulmonary pressure
  • rIPC

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Physiology
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

The effect of remote ischemic pre-conditioning on pulmonary vascular pressure and gas exchange in healthy humans during hypoxia. / Kim, Chul Ho; Sajgalik, Pavol; Van Iterson, Erik H.; Jae, Sae Young; Johnson, Bruce David.

In: Respiratory Physiology and Neurobiology, Vol. 261, 01.03.2019, p. 62-66.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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