The effect of high glucocorticoid administration and food restriction on rodent skeletal muscle mitochondrial function and protein metabolism

Y. Nancy You, Kevin R. Short, Marion Jourdan, Katherine A. Klaus, Stephane Walrand, K Sreekumaran Nair

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Glucocorticoids levels are high in catabolic conditions but it is unclear how much of the catabolic effects are due to negative energy balance versus glucocorticoids and whether there are distinct effects on metabolism and functions of specific muscle proteins. Methodology/Principal Findings: We determined whether 14 days of high dose methylprednisolone (MPred, 4 mg/kg/d) Vs food restriction (FR, food intake matched to MPred) in rats had different effects on muscle mitochondrial function and protein fractional synthesis rates (FSR). Lower weight loss (15%) occurred in FR than in MPred (30%) rats, while a 15% increase occurred saline-treated Controls. The per cent muscle loss was significantly greater for MPred than FR. Mitochondrial protein FSR in MPred rats was lower in soleus (51 and 43%, respectively) and plantaris (25 and 55%) than in FR, while similar decline in protein FSR of the mixed, sarcoplasmic, and myosin heavy chain occurred. Mitochondrial enzymatic activity and ATP production were unchanged in soleus while in plantaris cytochrome c oxidase activity was lower in FR than Control, and ATP production rate with pyruvate + malate in MPred plantaris was 28% lower in MPred. Branchedchain amino acid catabolic enzyme activities were higher in both FR and MPred rats indicating enhanced amino acid oxidation capacity. Conclusion/Significance: MPred and FR had little impact on mitochondrial function but reduction in muscle protein synthesis occurred in MPred that could be explained on the basis of reduced food intake. A greater decline in proteolysis may explain lesser muscle loss in FR than in MPred rats.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere5283
JournalPLoS One
Volume4
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 20 2009

Fingerprint

Muscle Proteins
Mitochondrial Proteins
glucocorticoids
protein metabolism
Metabolism
Glucocorticoids
fractional synthesis rate
Muscle
skeletal muscle
Rats
Rodentia
Skeletal Muscle
rodents
Food
rats
muscle protein
Proteins
muscles
food intake
Eating

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

The effect of high glucocorticoid administration and food restriction on rodent skeletal muscle mitochondrial function and protein metabolism. / You, Y. Nancy; Short, Kevin R.; Jourdan, Marion; Klaus, Katherine A.; Walrand, Stephane; Nair, K Sreekumaran.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 4, No. 4, e5283, 20.04.2009.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

You, Y. Nancy ; Short, Kevin R. ; Jourdan, Marion ; Klaus, Katherine A. ; Walrand, Stephane ; Nair, K Sreekumaran. / The effect of high glucocorticoid administration and food restriction on rodent skeletal muscle mitochondrial function and protein metabolism. In: PLoS One. 2009 ; Vol. 4, No. 4.
@article{02c88897793a4749b803d5ac55b710f1,
title = "The effect of high glucocorticoid administration and food restriction on rodent skeletal muscle mitochondrial function and protein metabolism",
abstract = "Background: Glucocorticoids levels are high in catabolic conditions but it is unclear how much of the catabolic effects are due to negative energy balance versus glucocorticoids and whether there are distinct effects on metabolism and functions of specific muscle proteins. Methodology/Principal Findings: We determined whether 14 days of high dose methylprednisolone (MPred, 4 mg/kg/d) Vs food restriction (FR, food intake matched to MPred) in rats had different effects on muscle mitochondrial function and protein fractional synthesis rates (FSR). Lower weight loss (15{\%}) occurred in FR than in MPred (30{\%}) rats, while a 15{\%} increase occurred saline-treated Controls. The per cent muscle loss was significantly greater for MPred than FR. Mitochondrial protein FSR in MPred rats was lower in soleus (51 and 43{\%}, respectively) and plantaris (25 and 55{\%}) than in FR, while similar decline in protein FSR of the mixed, sarcoplasmic, and myosin heavy chain occurred. Mitochondrial enzymatic activity and ATP production were unchanged in soleus while in plantaris cytochrome c oxidase activity was lower in FR than Control, and ATP production rate with pyruvate + malate in MPred plantaris was 28{\%} lower in MPred. Branchedchain amino acid catabolic enzyme activities were higher in both FR and MPred rats indicating enhanced amino acid oxidation capacity. Conclusion/Significance: MPred and FR had little impact on mitochondrial function but reduction in muscle protein synthesis occurred in MPred that could be explained on the basis of reduced food intake. A greater decline in proteolysis may explain lesser muscle loss in FR than in MPred rats.",
author = "You, {Y. Nancy} and Short, {Kevin R.} and Marion Jourdan and Klaus, {Katherine A.} and Stephane Walrand and Nair, {K Sreekumaran}",
year = "2009",
month = "4",
day = "20",
doi = "10.1371/journal.pone.0005283",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "4",
journal = "PLoS One",
issn = "1932-6203",
publisher = "Public Library of Science",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The effect of high glucocorticoid administration and food restriction on rodent skeletal muscle mitochondrial function and protein metabolism

AU - You, Y. Nancy

AU - Short, Kevin R.

AU - Jourdan, Marion

AU - Klaus, Katherine A.

AU - Walrand, Stephane

AU - Nair, K Sreekumaran

PY - 2009/4/20

Y1 - 2009/4/20

N2 - Background: Glucocorticoids levels are high in catabolic conditions but it is unclear how much of the catabolic effects are due to negative energy balance versus glucocorticoids and whether there are distinct effects on metabolism and functions of specific muscle proteins. Methodology/Principal Findings: We determined whether 14 days of high dose methylprednisolone (MPred, 4 mg/kg/d) Vs food restriction (FR, food intake matched to MPred) in rats had different effects on muscle mitochondrial function and protein fractional synthesis rates (FSR). Lower weight loss (15%) occurred in FR than in MPred (30%) rats, while a 15% increase occurred saline-treated Controls. The per cent muscle loss was significantly greater for MPred than FR. Mitochondrial protein FSR in MPred rats was lower in soleus (51 and 43%, respectively) and plantaris (25 and 55%) than in FR, while similar decline in protein FSR of the mixed, sarcoplasmic, and myosin heavy chain occurred. Mitochondrial enzymatic activity and ATP production were unchanged in soleus while in plantaris cytochrome c oxidase activity was lower in FR than Control, and ATP production rate with pyruvate + malate in MPred plantaris was 28% lower in MPred. Branchedchain amino acid catabolic enzyme activities were higher in both FR and MPred rats indicating enhanced amino acid oxidation capacity. Conclusion/Significance: MPred and FR had little impact on mitochondrial function but reduction in muscle protein synthesis occurred in MPred that could be explained on the basis of reduced food intake. A greater decline in proteolysis may explain lesser muscle loss in FR than in MPred rats.

AB - Background: Glucocorticoids levels are high in catabolic conditions but it is unclear how much of the catabolic effects are due to negative energy balance versus glucocorticoids and whether there are distinct effects on metabolism and functions of specific muscle proteins. Methodology/Principal Findings: We determined whether 14 days of high dose methylprednisolone (MPred, 4 mg/kg/d) Vs food restriction (FR, food intake matched to MPred) in rats had different effects on muscle mitochondrial function and protein fractional synthesis rates (FSR). Lower weight loss (15%) occurred in FR than in MPred (30%) rats, while a 15% increase occurred saline-treated Controls. The per cent muscle loss was significantly greater for MPred than FR. Mitochondrial protein FSR in MPred rats was lower in soleus (51 and 43%, respectively) and plantaris (25 and 55%) than in FR, while similar decline in protein FSR of the mixed, sarcoplasmic, and myosin heavy chain occurred. Mitochondrial enzymatic activity and ATP production were unchanged in soleus while in plantaris cytochrome c oxidase activity was lower in FR than Control, and ATP production rate with pyruvate + malate in MPred plantaris was 28% lower in MPred. Branchedchain amino acid catabolic enzyme activities were higher in both FR and MPred rats indicating enhanced amino acid oxidation capacity. Conclusion/Significance: MPred and FR had little impact on mitochondrial function but reduction in muscle protein synthesis occurred in MPred that could be explained on the basis of reduced food intake. A greater decline in proteolysis may explain lesser muscle loss in FR than in MPred rats.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=65349195016&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=65349195016&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1371/journal.pone.0005283

DO - 10.1371/journal.pone.0005283

M3 - Article

VL - 4

JO - PLoS One

JF - PLoS One

SN - 1932-6203

IS - 4

M1 - e5283

ER -