The effect of carbon dioxide on oxygen-induced retinopathy in the neonatal rat

Jonathan M. Holmes, Shuichen Zhang, David A. Leske, William L. Lanier

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

34 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose. Hypercarbia has been suggested as a risk factor for retinopathy of prematurity. We investigated the effect of raised inspired carbon dioxide on oxygen-induced retinopathy in the neonatal rat. Methods. Newborn rats raised in expanded litters (n = 25 each) were exposed to cycles of hyperoxia (80% O2) and hypoxia (10% O2) for 7 days, followed by room air recovery for 5 days. During cyclic oxygen exposure, 3 Litters (n = 75) were exposed to 10% CO2 (PaCO2 78 mm Hg ± 6; mean ± SD) and 3 litters (n = 75) were exposed to 0.2% CO2 (PaCO2 45 mm Hg ± 7). Animals were sacrificed on day 13 and retinae were analyzed using fluorescein perfusion and ADPase staining techniques. Results. Neovascularization occurred in 85% of rats exposed to high CO2 compared to 52% of rats exposed to low COP (p = 0.001). The severity of neovascularization, in clock hours, was also greater in the rats exposed to high CO2 (p < 0.001). Conclusions. Exposure to high CO2 results in an increased incidence and severity of neovascularization in a rat model for oxygen-induced retinopathy. Our results support the suggestion that hypercarbia may be a risk factor for retinopathy of prematurity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)725-732
Number of pages8
JournalCurrent Eye Research
Volume16
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 14 1997

Keywords

  • Carbon dioxide
  • Hypercarbia
  • Oxygen-induced retinopathy
  • Rat
  • Retinopathy of prematurity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology
  • Sensory Systems
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

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