The effect of an automated point of care tool on diagnosis and management of childhood obesity in primary care

Natalie Gentile, Valeria Cristiani, Brian A. Lynch, Patrick M. Wilson, Amy L. Weaver, Lila J. Rutten, Debra J. Jacobson, Rajeev Chaudhry, Swetha Sriram, Seema Kumar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Childhood obesity is underdiagnosed in primary care practices. Our study aimed to compare rates of documentation of diagnosis of obesity and counselling for nutrition and physical activity at an academic primary care practice prior to and following implementation of a body mass index (BMI)-based electronic point of care clinical reminder tool. Methods: We performed a retrospective record review of children aged 2–18 years undergoing well child visits during any of three calendar years (2009, 2011 and 2013). The electronic clinical reminder tool was implemented in September 2010. Records of children with BMI > 95th percentile were electronically searched for terms of documentation of diagnosis of obesity and nutrition and physical activity counselling. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to adjust for potential patient and provider confounders. Results: Among those with BMI ≥ 95th percentile, there was a statistically significant increase in documentation of diagnosis of obesity (45.5% in 2009 vs. 52.4% in 2011; P < 0.001; adjusted odds ratio 1.36; 95% CI 1.13–1.65) and in counselling for physical activity and nutrition (66.8% in 2009 vs. 75.2% in 2011; P < 0.001; adjusted odds ratio 1.33; 95% CI 1.06–1.66) following implementation of the tool. Compared with 2011, there was no statistically significant increase in documentation of obesity (50.4%) or nutrition and physical activity counselling (77.9%) in 2013. Conclusions: The implementation of a point of care clinical reminder tool was associated with improvement in documentation of diagnosis of obesity and counselling for nutrition and physical activity. Further studies are needed to determine the impact of these automated tools on weight outcomes in children.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)958-964
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice
Volume22
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2016

Keywords

  • diagnosis
  • health care
  • health services research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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