The effect of age on the key parameters in the Chicago classification

A study using high-resolution esophageal manometry in asymptomatic normal individuals

K. W. Jung, Hwoon Yong Jung, S. J. Myung, S. O. Kim, J. Lee, I. J. Yoon, S. Y. Seo, J. H. Lee, D. H. Kim, K. D. Choi, H. J. Song, G. H. Lee, Joseph A Murray, Y. Romero, J. H. Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: High-resolution manometry using the Chicago classification, which utilizes parameters including integrated relaxation pressure (IRP), distal contractile integral (DCI), and contractile front velocity (CFV), shows better diagnostic ability than previous conventional criteria. However, the current normal cut-off values for the Chicago classification are based on individuals aged 19-48 years and do not include older people. Here, we aimed to assess the normal values for the Chicago classification in individuals aged 20-67 years and compare the parameters across age groups. Methods: Fifty-four asymptomatic healthy individuals (27 male and 27 female; age range. 20-67 years) were prospectively enrolled. To evaluate the effect of age and sex on manometric profiles, we attempted to enroll equal numbers of male and female subjects for each decade. Manometry was performed in both the supine and sitting positions. Key Results: The distal latency (DL) was significantly shorter with increasing age in both measurement positions. Furthermore, IRP was significantly higher with increasing age in both positions. Spearman's ranked correlation coefficient analysis indicated that DCI and IRP in both positions were positively correlated with age. Conclusions & Inferences: Age affects the key parameters currently used in the Chicago classification, including IRP, DCI, and DL. Larger prospective studies with older subjects are needed to determine the age-related normal values for the Chicago classification system. Increasing age can significantly affect the key parameters of the Chicago classification system, especially integrated relaxation pressure, distal contractile integral, and distal latency. The manometric profiles of elderly people should therefore be interpreted with caution.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)246-257
Number of pages12
JournalNeurogastroenterology and Motility
Volume27
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2015

Fingerprint

Manometry
Pressure
Reference Values
Supine Position
Posture
Age Groups
Prospective Studies

Keywords

  • Dysphagia
  • Esophageal manometry
  • High-resolution esophageal manometry

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Endocrine and Autonomic Systems
  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

The effect of age on the key parameters in the Chicago classification : A study using high-resolution esophageal manometry in asymptomatic normal individuals. / Jung, K. W.; Jung, Hwoon Yong; Myung, S. J.; Kim, S. O.; Lee, J.; Yoon, I. J.; Seo, S. Y.; Lee, J. H.; Kim, D. H.; Choi, K. D.; Song, H. J.; Lee, G. H.; Murray, Joseph A; Romero, Y.; Kim, J. H.

In: Neurogastroenterology and Motility, Vol. 27, No. 2, 01.02.2015, p. 246-257.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Jung, KW, Jung, HY, Myung, SJ, Kim, SO, Lee, J, Yoon, IJ, Seo, SY, Lee, JH, Kim, DH, Choi, KD, Song, HJ, Lee, GH, Murray, JA, Romero, Y & Kim, JH 2015, 'The effect of age on the key parameters in the Chicago classification: A study using high-resolution esophageal manometry in asymptomatic normal individuals', Neurogastroenterology and Motility, vol. 27, no. 2, pp. 246-257. https://doi.org/10.1111/nmo.12482
Jung, K. W. ; Jung, Hwoon Yong ; Myung, S. J. ; Kim, S. O. ; Lee, J. ; Yoon, I. J. ; Seo, S. Y. ; Lee, J. H. ; Kim, D. H. ; Choi, K. D. ; Song, H. J. ; Lee, G. H. ; Murray, Joseph A ; Romero, Y. ; Kim, J. H. / The effect of age on the key parameters in the Chicago classification : A study using high-resolution esophageal manometry in asymptomatic normal individuals. In: Neurogastroenterology and Motility. 2015 ; Vol. 27, No. 2. pp. 246-257.
@article{3eed656934cf4656ab29809b3a04d2d0,
title = "The effect of age on the key parameters in the Chicago classification: A study using high-resolution esophageal manometry in asymptomatic normal individuals",
abstract = "Background: High-resolution manometry using the Chicago classification, which utilizes parameters including integrated relaxation pressure (IRP), distal contractile integral (DCI), and contractile front velocity (CFV), shows better diagnostic ability than previous conventional criteria. However, the current normal cut-off values for the Chicago classification are based on individuals aged 19-48 years and do not include older people. Here, we aimed to assess the normal values for the Chicago classification in individuals aged 20-67 years and compare the parameters across age groups. Methods: Fifty-four asymptomatic healthy individuals (27 male and 27 female; age range. 20-67 years) were prospectively enrolled. To evaluate the effect of age and sex on manometric profiles, we attempted to enroll equal numbers of male and female subjects for each decade. Manometry was performed in both the supine and sitting positions. Key Results: The distal latency (DL) was significantly shorter with increasing age in both measurement positions. Furthermore, IRP was significantly higher with increasing age in both positions. Spearman's ranked correlation coefficient analysis indicated that DCI and IRP in both positions were positively correlated with age. Conclusions & Inferences: Age affects the key parameters currently used in the Chicago classification, including IRP, DCI, and DL. Larger prospective studies with older subjects are needed to determine the age-related normal values for the Chicago classification system. Increasing age can significantly affect the key parameters of the Chicago classification system, especially integrated relaxation pressure, distal contractile integral, and distal latency. The manometric profiles of elderly people should therefore be interpreted with caution.",
keywords = "Dysphagia, Esophageal manometry, High-resolution esophageal manometry",
author = "Jung, {K. W.} and Jung, {Hwoon Yong} and Myung, {S. J.} and Kim, {S. O.} and J. Lee and Yoon, {I. J.} and Seo, {S. Y.} and Lee, {J. H.} and Kim, {D. H.} and Choi, {K. D.} and Song, {H. J.} and Lee, {G. H.} and Murray, {Joseph A} and Y. Romero and Kim, {J. H.}",
year = "2015",
month = "2",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/nmo.12482",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "27",
pages = "246--257",
journal = "Neurogastroenterology and Motility",
issn = "1350-1925",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The effect of age on the key parameters in the Chicago classification

T2 - A study using high-resolution esophageal manometry in asymptomatic normal individuals

AU - Jung, K. W.

AU - Jung, Hwoon Yong

AU - Myung, S. J.

AU - Kim, S. O.

AU - Lee, J.

AU - Yoon, I. J.

AU - Seo, S. Y.

AU - Lee, J. H.

AU - Kim, D. H.

AU - Choi, K. D.

AU - Song, H. J.

AU - Lee, G. H.

AU - Murray, Joseph A

AU - Romero, Y.

AU - Kim, J. H.

PY - 2015/2/1

Y1 - 2015/2/1

N2 - Background: High-resolution manometry using the Chicago classification, which utilizes parameters including integrated relaxation pressure (IRP), distal contractile integral (DCI), and contractile front velocity (CFV), shows better diagnostic ability than previous conventional criteria. However, the current normal cut-off values for the Chicago classification are based on individuals aged 19-48 years and do not include older people. Here, we aimed to assess the normal values for the Chicago classification in individuals aged 20-67 years and compare the parameters across age groups. Methods: Fifty-four asymptomatic healthy individuals (27 male and 27 female; age range. 20-67 years) were prospectively enrolled. To evaluate the effect of age and sex on manometric profiles, we attempted to enroll equal numbers of male and female subjects for each decade. Manometry was performed in both the supine and sitting positions. Key Results: The distal latency (DL) was significantly shorter with increasing age in both measurement positions. Furthermore, IRP was significantly higher with increasing age in both positions. Spearman's ranked correlation coefficient analysis indicated that DCI and IRP in both positions were positively correlated with age. Conclusions & Inferences: Age affects the key parameters currently used in the Chicago classification, including IRP, DCI, and DL. Larger prospective studies with older subjects are needed to determine the age-related normal values for the Chicago classification system. Increasing age can significantly affect the key parameters of the Chicago classification system, especially integrated relaxation pressure, distal contractile integral, and distal latency. The manometric profiles of elderly people should therefore be interpreted with caution.

AB - Background: High-resolution manometry using the Chicago classification, which utilizes parameters including integrated relaxation pressure (IRP), distal contractile integral (DCI), and contractile front velocity (CFV), shows better diagnostic ability than previous conventional criteria. However, the current normal cut-off values for the Chicago classification are based on individuals aged 19-48 years and do not include older people. Here, we aimed to assess the normal values for the Chicago classification in individuals aged 20-67 years and compare the parameters across age groups. Methods: Fifty-four asymptomatic healthy individuals (27 male and 27 female; age range. 20-67 years) were prospectively enrolled. To evaluate the effect of age and sex on manometric profiles, we attempted to enroll equal numbers of male and female subjects for each decade. Manometry was performed in both the supine and sitting positions. Key Results: The distal latency (DL) was significantly shorter with increasing age in both measurement positions. Furthermore, IRP was significantly higher with increasing age in both positions. Spearman's ranked correlation coefficient analysis indicated that DCI and IRP in both positions were positively correlated with age. Conclusions & Inferences: Age affects the key parameters currently used in the Chicago classification, including IRP, DCI, and DL. Larger prospective studies with older subjects are needed to determine the age-related normal values for the Chicago classification system. Increasing age can significantly affect the key parameters of the Chicago classification system, especially integrated relaxation pressure, distal contractile integral, and distal latency. The manometric profiles of elderly people should therefore be interpreted with caution.

KW - Dysphagia

KW - Esophageal manometry

KW - High-resolution esophageal manometry

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84921541055&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84921541055&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/nmo.12482

DO - 10.1111/nmo.12482

M3 - Article

VL - 27

SP - 246

EP - 257

JO - Neurogastroenterology and Motility

JF - Neurogastroenterology and Motility

SN - 1350-1925

IS - 2

ER -