The economic design of an X̄ control chart recognizing process improvement

E. A. Silver, T. R. Rohleder

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this paper we consider the use of an X̄-chart for controlling a single-stage process. The three controllable variables, as usual, are the interval between consecutive samples, the sample size, and the distance away from the in-control process mean at which the control limits are placed. Costs considered are those of sampling, false alarms, operating when the process is out-of-control, and identification of underlying causes/putting process back in control. Most importantly, we take account of process improvement (reduction in the frequency of out-of-control situations) as causes are determined and possibly eliminated. An optimal procedure for dynamically setting the values of the three control parameters is presented and compared over a wide range of numerical examples with two simpler approaches. There are substantial cost savings associated with taking account of process improvement.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)393-412
Number of pages20
JournalInternational Journal of Production Research
Volume37
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1999
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Economics
Control charts
Economic design
Process improvement
Costs
Sampling

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Management Science and Operations Research
  • Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering

Cite this

The economic design of an X̄ control chart recognizing process improvement. / Silver, E. A.; Rohleder, T. R.

In: International Journal of Production Research, Vol. 37, No. 2, 1999, p. 393-412.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{9f37cbe67d4543b1b56b11639879603a,
title = "The economic design of an X̄ control chart recognizing process improvement",
abstract = "In this paper we consider the use of an X̄-chart for controlling a single-stage process. The three controllable variables, as usual, are the interval between consecutive samples, the sample size, and the distance away from the in-control process mean at which the control limits are placed. Costs considered are those of sampling, false alarms, operating when the process is out-of-control, and identification of underlying causes/putting process back in control. Most importantly, we take account of process improvement (reduction in the frequency of out-of-control situations) as causes are determined and possibly eliminated. An optimal procedure for dynamically setting the values of the three control parameters is presented and compared over a wide range of numerical examples with two simpler approaches. There are substantial cost savings associated with taking account of process improvement.",
author = "Silver, {E. A.} and Rohleder, {T. R.}",
year = "1999",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "37",
pages = "393--412",
journal = "International Journal of Production Research",
issn = "0020-7543",
publisher = "Taylor and Francis Ltd.",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The economic design of an X̄ control chart recognizing process improvement

AU - Silver, E. A.

AU - Rohleder, T. R.

PY - 1999

Y1 - 1999

N2 - In this paper we consider the use of an X̄-chart for controlling a single-stage process. The three controllable variables, as usual, are the interval between consecutive samples, the sample size, and the distance away from the in-control process mean at which the control limits are placed. Costs considered are those of sampling, false alarms, operating when the process is out-of-control, and identification of underlying causes/putting process back in control. Most importantly, we take account of process improvement (reduction in the frequency of out-of-control situations) as causes are determined and possibly eliminated. An optimal procedure for dynamically setting the values of the three control parameters is presented and compared over a wide range of numerical examples with two simpler approaches. There are substantial cost savings associated with taking account of process improvement.

AB - In this paper we consider the use of an X̄-chart for controlling a single-stage process. The three controllable variables, as usual, are the interval between consecutive samples, the sample size, and the distance away from the in-control process mean at which the control limits are placed. Costs considered are those of sampling, false alarms, operating when the process is out-of-control, and identification of underlying causes/putting process back in control. Most importantly, we take account of process improvement (reduction in the frequency of out-of-control situations) as causes are determined and possibly eliminated. An optimal procedure for dynamically setting the values of the three control parameters is presented and compared over a wide range of numerical examples with two simpler approaches. There are substantial cost savings associated with taking account of process improvement.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0032785101&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0032785101&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:0032785101

VL - 37

SP - 393

EP - 412

JO - International Journal of Production Research

JF - International Journal of Production Research

SN - 0020-7543

IS - 2

ER -