The dynamic architectural and epigenetic nuclear landscape: Developing the genomic almanac of biology and disease

Phillip W L Tai, Sayyed K. Zaidi, Hai Wu, Rodrigo A. Grandy, Martin Montecino, Andre J van Wijnen, Jane B. Lian, Gary S. Stein, Janet L. Stein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Compaction of the eukaryotic genome into the confined space of the cell nucleus must occur faithfully throughout each cell cycle to retain gene expression fidelity. For decades, experimental limitations to study the structural organization of the interphase nucleus restricted our understanding of its contributions towards gene regulation and disease. However, within the past few years, our capability to visualize chromosomes in vivo with sophisticated fluorescence microscopy, and to characterize chromosomal regulatory environments via massively parallel sequencing methodologies have drastically changed how we currently understand epigenetic gene control within the context of three-dimensional nuclear structure. The rapid rate at which information on nuclear structure is unfolding brings challenges to compare and contrast recent observations with historic findings. In this review, we discuss experimental breakthroughs that have influenced how we understand and explore the dynamic structure and function of the nucleus, and how we can incorporate historical perspectives with insights acquired from the ever-evolving advances in molecular biology and pathology. J. Cell. Physiol. 229: 711-727, 2014.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)711-727
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Cellular Physiology
Volume229
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2014

Fingerprint

Almanacs
Epigenomics
Gene expression
Genes
Confined Spaces
Cells
High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing
Molecular biology
Molecular Pathology
Fluorescence microscopy
Interphase
Pathology
Chromosomes
Cell Nucleus
Fluorescence Microscopy
Molecular Biology
Cell Cycle
Compaction
Genome
Gene Expression

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Cell Biology
  • Physiology

Cite this

Tai, P. W. L., Zaidi, S. K., Wu, H., Grandy, R. A., Montecino, M., van Wijnen, A. J., ... Stein, J. L. (2014). The dynamic architectural and epigenetic nuclear landscape: Developing the genomic almanac of biology and disease. Journal of Cellular Physiology, 229(6), 711-727. https://doi.org/10.1002/jcp.24508

The dynamic architectural and epigenetic nuclear landscape : Developing the genomic almanac of biology and disease. / Tai, Phillip W L; Zaidi, Sayyed K.; Wu, Hai; Grandy, Rodrigo A.; Montecino, Martin; van Wijnen, Andre J; Lian, Jane B.; Stein, Gary S.; Stein, Janet L.

In: Journal of Cellular Physiology, Vol. 229, No. 6, 06.2014, p. 711-727.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tai, PWL, Zaidi, SK, Wu, H, Grandy, RA, Montecino, M, van Wijnen, AJ, Lian, JB, Stein, GS & Stein, JL 2014, 'The dynamic architectural and epigenetic nuclear landscape: Developing the genomic almanac of biology and disease', Journal of Cellular Physiology, vol. 229, no. 6, pp. 711-727. https://doi.org/10.1002/jcp.24508
Tai, Phillip W L ; Zaidi, Sayyed K. ; Wu, Hai ; Grandy, Rodrigo A. ; Montecino, Martin ; van Wijnen, Andre J ; Lian, Jane B. ; Stein, Gary S. ; Stein, Janet L. / The dynamic architectural and epigenetic nuclear landscape : Developing the genomic almanac of biology and disease. In: Journal of Cellular Physiology. 2014 ; Vol. 229, No. 6. pp. 711-727.
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