The COMPASS initiative: Description of a nationwide collaborative approach to the care of patients with depression and diabetes and/or cardiovascular disease

Karen J. Coleman, Sanne Magnan, Claire Neely, Leif Solberg, Arne Beck, Jim Trevis, Carla Heim, Mark D Williams, David J Katzelnick, Jürgen Unützer, Betsy Pollock, Erin Hafer, Robert Ferguson, Steve Williams

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To describe a national effort to disseminate and implement an evidence-based collaborative care management model for patients with both depression and poorly controlled diabetes and/or cardiovascular disease across multiple, real-world diverse clinical practice sites. Methods: Goals for the initiative were as follows: (1) to improve depression symptoms in 40% of patients, (2) to improve diabetes and hypertension control rates by 20%, (3) to increase provider satisfaction by 20%, (4) to improve patient satisfaction with their care by 20% and (5) to demonstrate cost savings. A Care Management Tracking System was used for collecting clinical care information to create performance measures for quality improvement while also assessing the overall accomplishment of these goals. Results: The Care of Mental, Physical and Substance-use Syndromes (COMPASS) initiative spread an evidence-based collaborative care model among 18 medical groups and 172 clinics in eight states. We describe the initiative's evidence-base and methods for others to replicate our work. Conclusions: The COMPASS initiative demonstrated that a diverse set of health care systems and other organizations can work together to rapidly implement an evidence-based care model for complex, hard-to-reach patients. We present this model as an example of how the time gap between research and practice can be reduced on a large scale.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalGeneral Hospital Psychiatry
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Oct 23 2015

Fingerprint

Patient Care
Cardiovascular Diseases
Patient Care Management
Depression
Cost Savings
Quality Improvement
Patient Satisfaction
Organizations
Hypertension
Delivery of Health Care
Research

Keywords

  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Collaborative care
  • Depression
  • Implementation
  • Integrated behavioral health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

The COMPASS initiative : Description of a nationwide collaborative approach to the care of patients with depression and diabetes and/or cardiovascular disease. / Coleman, Karen J.; Magnan, Sanne; Neely, Claire; Solberg, Leif; Beck, Arne; Trevis, Jim; Heim, Carla; Williams, Mark D; Katzelnick, David J; Unützer, Jürgen; Pollock, Betsy; Hafer, Erin; Ferguson, Robert; Williams, Steve.

In: General Hospital Psychiatry, 23.10.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Coleman, Karen J. ; Magnan, Sanne ; Neely, Claire ; Solberg, Leif ; Beck, Arne ; Trevis, Jim ; Heim, Carla ; Williams, Mark D ; Katzelnick, David J ; Unützer, Jürgen ; Pollock, Betsy ; Hafer, Erin ; Ferguson, Robert ; Williams, Steve. / The COMPASS initiative : Description of a nationwide collaborative approach to the care of patients with depression and diabetes and/or cardiovascular disease. In: General Hospital Psychiatry. 2015.
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