The Case of Dr. Oz: Ethics, Evidence, and Does Professional Self-Regulation Work?

Jon C Tilburt, Megan Allyse, Frederic W. Hafferty

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Dr. Mehmet Oz is widely known not just as a successful media personality donning the title "America's Doctor®," but, we suggest, also as a physician visibly out of step with his profession. A recent, unsuccessful attempt to censure Dr. Oz raises the issue of whether the medical profession can effectively self-regulate at all. It also raises concern that the medical profession's self-regulation might be selectively activated, perhaps only when the subject of professional censure has achieved a level of public visibility. We argue here that the medical profession must look at itself with a healthy dose of self-doubt about whether it has sufficient knowledge of or handle on the less visible Dr. "Ozes" quietly operating under the profession's presumptive endorsement.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)199-206
Number of pages8
JournalAMA journal of ethics
Volume19
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2017

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Professional Autonomy
Ethics
Personality
Physicians
Self-Control

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

The Case of Dr. Oz : Ethics, Evidence, and Does Professional Self-Regulation Work? / Tilburt, Jon C; Allyse, Megan; Hafferty, Frederic W.

In: AMA journal of ethics, Vol. 19, No. 2, 01.02.2017, p. 199-206.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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