The Capabilities and Limitations of Clinical Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Detecting Kidney Stones

A Retrospective Study

El Sayed H Ibrahim, Joseph G. Cernigliaro, Mellena D. Bridges, Robert A. Pooley, William E Haley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The purpose of this work was to investigate the performance of currently available magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for detecting kidney stones, compared to computed tomography (CT) results, and to determine the characteristics of successfully detected stones. Patients who had undergone both abdominal/pelvic CT and MRI exams within 30 days were studied. The images were reviewed by two expert radiologists blinded to the patients' respective radiological diagnoses. The study consisted of four steps: (1) reviewing the MRI images and determining whether any kidney stone(s) are identified; (2) reviewing the corresponding CT images and confirming whether kidney stones are identified; (3) reviewing the MRI images a second time, armed with the information from the corresponding CT, noting whether any kidney stones are positively identified that were previously missed; (4) for all stones MRI-confirmed on previous steps, the radiologist experts being asked to answer whether in retrospect, with knowledge of size and location on corresponding CT, these stones would be affirmed as confidently identified on MRI or not. In this best-case scenario involving knowledge of stones and their locations on concurrent CT, radiologist experts detected 19% of kidney stones on MRI, with stone size being a major factor for stone identification.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number4935656
JournalInternational Journal of Biomedical Imaging
Volume2016
DOIs
StatePublished - 2016

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Kidney Calculi
Retrospective Studies
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Tomography
Radiologists

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

The Capabilities and Limitations of Clinical Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Detecting Kidney Stones : A Retrospective Study. / Ibrahim, El Sayed H; Cernigliaro, Joseph G.; Bridges, Mellena D.; Pooley, Robert A.; Haley, William E.

In: International Journal of Biomedical Imaging, Vol. 2016, 4935656, 2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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