The association of neuropsychiatric symptoms in MCI with incident dementia and alzheimer disease

Paul B. Rosenberg, Michelle M. Mielke, Brian S. Appleby, Esther S. Oh, Yonas E. Geda, Constantine G. Lyketsos

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

135 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives: Individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) are at high risk of developing dementia and/or Alzheimer disease (AD). Among persons with MCI, depression and anxiety have been associated with an increased risk of incident dementia. We examined whether neuropsychiatric symptoms in MCI increased the risk of incident dementia (all-cause) and incident AD. Design: Longitudinal cohort study followed annually (median: 1.58 years). Setting: National Alzheimer's Coordinating Center database combining clinical data from 29 Alzheimer's Disease Centers. Participants: A total of 1,821 participants with MCI. Measurements: 1) Progression to dementia (all-cause) or AD, 2) Neuropsychiatric Inventory Questionnaire (NPI-Q), 3) Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS), 4) Clinical Dementia Rating Global Score and Sum of Boxes, and 5) Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE). The association of covariates with risk of incident dementia or AD was evaluated with hazard ratios (HR) determined by Cox proportional-hazards models adjusted for age, ethnicity, Clinical Dementia Rating Global Score and Sum of Boxes, and MMSE. Results: A total of 527 participants (28.9%) progressed to dementia and 454 (24.9%) to AD. Baseline GDS > 0 was associated with an increased risk of incident dementia (HR: 1.47, 95% CI: 1.17-1.84) and AD (HR: 1.45, 95% CI: 1.14-1.83). Baseline NPI > 0 was associated with an increased risk of incident dementia (HR: 1.37, 95% CI: 1.12-1.66) and AD (HR: 1.35, 95% CI: 1.09-1.66). Conclusions: Neuropsychiatric symptoms in MCI are associated with significantly an increased risk of incident dementia and AD. Neuropsychiatric symptoms may be among the earliest symptoms of preclinical stages of AD and targeting them therapeutically might delay transition to dementia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)685-695
Number of pages11
JournalAmerican Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
Volume21
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2013

Keywords

  • Alzheimer disease
  • Dementia
  • Depression
  • Longitudinal study
  • Mild cognitive impairment
  • Neuropsychiatric symptoms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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