The association between fruit and vegetable intake, knowledge of the recommendations, and health information seeking within adults in the U.S. Mainland and in Puerto Rico

Uriyoán Colón-Ramos, Lila J Rutten, Richard P. Moser, Vivian Colón-Lopez, Ana P. Ortiz, Amy Lazarus Yaroch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Health information correlates of fruit and vegetable intake and of knowledge of the fruit and vegetable recommendations were examined using bivariate and multivariate regressions with data from the 2007-2008 U.S. National Cancer Institute's Health Information National Trends Survey in the United States and in Puerto Rico. Residents from Puerto Rico had the lowest reported fruit and vegetable intake and the lowest knowledge of the recommended servings of fruits and vegetables to maintain good health, compared with U.S. Hispanics, non-Hispanic Whites, and Blacks. Sixty-seven percent of Puerto Rican residents and 62% of U.S. Hispanics reported never seeking information on health or medical topics. In multivariate analysis, those who never sought information on health or medical topics reported significantly lower fruit and vegetable intake (coefficient = -0.24; 95% CI [-0.38, -0.09]), and were less likely to know the fruit and vegetable recommendations (OR = 0.32; 95% CI [0.20, 0.52]), compared with those who obtained information from their health care providers. Health promotion initiatives in the United States and Puerto Rico have invested in mass media campaigns to increase consumption of and knowledge about fruit and vegetables, but populations with the lowest intake are less likely to seek information. Strategies must be multipronged to address institutional, economic, and behavioral constraints of populations who do not seek out health information from any sources.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)105-111
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Health Communication
Volume20
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2 2015

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Puerto Rico
Vegetables
health information
Fruits
vegetables
Fruit
Health
Hispanic Americans
health
resident
Mass Media
institutional economics
National Cancer Institute (U.S.)
National Institutes of Health (U.S.)
Health Promotion
Health care
mass media
multivariate analysis
Health Personnel
health promotion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health(social science)
  • Library and Information Sciences
  • Communication
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

The association between fruit and vegetable intake, knowledge of the recommendations, and health information seeking within adults in the U.S. Mainland and in Puerto Rico. / Colón-Ramos, Uriyoán; Rutten, Lila J; Moser, Richard P.; Colón-Lopez, Vivian; Ortiz, Ana P.; Yaroch, Amy Lazarus.

In: Journal of Health Communication, Vol. 20, No. 1, 02.01.2015, p. 105-111.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Colón-Ramos, Uriyoán ; Rutten, Lila J ; Moser, Richard P. ; Colón-Lopez, Vivian ; Ortiz, Ana P. ; Yaroch, Amy Lazarus. / The association between fruit and vegetable intake, knowledge of the recommendations, and health information seeking within adults in the U.S. Mainland and in Puerto Rico. In: Journal of Health Communication. 2015 ; Vol. 20, No. 1. pp. 105-111.
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