The anatomy of the perineal branch of the sciatic nerve

Christopher M. Gibbs, Alexander D. Ginsburg, Thomas J. Wilson, Nirusha Lachman, Mario Hevesi, Robert J. Spinner, Aaron Krych

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A "perineal" branch of the sciatic nerve has been visualized during surgery, but there is currently no description of this nerve branch in the literature. Our study investigates the presence and frequency of occurrence of perineal innervation by the sciatic nerve and characterizes its anatomy in the posterior thigh. Fifteen cadavers were obtained for dissection. Descriptive results were recorded and analyzed statistically. Twenty-one sciatic nerves were adequately anatomically preserved. Six sciatic nerves contained a perineal branch. Five sciatic nerves had a branch contributing to the perineal branch of the posterior femoral cutaneous (PFC) nerve. In specimens with adequate anatomical preservation, the perineal branch of the sciatic nerve passed posterior to the ischial tuberosity in three specimens and posterior to the conjoint tendon of the long head of biceps femoris and semitendinosus muscles (conjoint tendon) in one. In specimens in which the perineal branch of the PFC nerve received a contribution from the sciatic nerve, the branch passed posterior to the sacrotuberous ligament in one case and posterior to the conjoint tendon in three. Unilateral nerve anatomy was found to be a poor predictor of contralateral anatomy (Cohen's kappa=0.06). Our study demonstrates for the first time the presence and frequency of occurrence of the perineal branch of the sciatic nerve and a sciatic contribution to the perineal branch of the PFC nerve. Clinicians should be cognizant of this nerve and its varying anatomy so their practice is better informed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalClinical Anatomy
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

Fingerprint

Sciatic Nerve
Anatomy
Femoral Nerve
Tendons
Skin
Thigh
Cadaver
Ligaments
Dissection
Muscles

Keywords

  • Perineal branch
  • Posterior femoral cutaneous nerve
  • Sciatic nerve

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anatomy
  • Histology

Cite this

Gibbs, C. M., Ginsburg, A. D., Wilson, T. J., Lachman, N., Hevesi, M., Spinner, R. J., & Krych, A. (Accepted/In press). The anatomy of the perineal branch of the sciatic nerve. Clinical Anatomy. https://doi.org/10.1002/ca.23061

The anatomy of the perineal branch of the sciatic nerve. / Gibbs, Christopher M.; Ginsburg, Alexander D.; Wilson, Thomas J.; Lachman, Nirusha; Hevesi, Mario; Spinner, Robert J.; Krych, Aaron.

In: Clinical Anatomy, 01.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gibbs, CM, Ginsburg, AD, Wilson, TJ, Lachman, N, Hevesi, M, Spinner, RJ & Krych, A 2018, 'The anatomy of the perineal branch of the sciatic nerve', Clinical Anatomy. https://doi.org/10.1002/ca.23061
Gibbs CM, Ginsburg AD, Wilson TJ, Lachman N, Hevesi M, Spinner RJ et al. The anatomy of the perineal branch of the sciatic nerve. Clinical Anatomy. 2018 Jan 1. https://doi.org/10.1002/ca.23061
Gibbs, Christopher M. ; Ginsburg, Alexander D. ; Wilson, Thomas J. ; Lachman, Nirusha ; Hevesi, Mario ; Spinner, Robert J. ; Krych, Aaron. / The anatomy of the perineal branch of the sciatic nerve. In: Clinical Anatomy. 2018.
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