Techniques of Immunosuppression After Cardiac Transplantation

MICHAEL D. McGOON, ROBERT P. FRANTZ

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9 Scopus citations

Abstract

Modulation of the normal immune response is the major challenge for successful organ transplantation. Cardiac allograft rejection is primarily the result of activation of T cells. Most currently used immunosuppressive agents mainly affect the T-cell-mediated limb of the immune system. Immunosuppressive strategies can be considered to have three goals: (1) prophylaxis against rejection early after cardiac transplantation, (2) long-term maintenance prophylaxis, and (3) treatment of acute rejection. The extent of immunosuppression needed varies with the time after transplantation and the rejection profile of the individual patient. The goal is to provide sufficient immunosuppression to retard rejection without causing undesirable side effects, including infection and neoplasms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)586-595
Number of pages10
JournalMayo Clinic proceedings
Volume67
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1992

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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