Tau-positron emission tomography correlates with neuropathology findings

Val J. Lowe, Emily S. Lundt, Sabrina M. Albertson, Hoon Ki Min, Ping Fang, Scott A. Przybelski, Matthew L. Senjem, Christopher G. Schwarz, Kejal Kantarci, Bradley Boeve, David T. Jones, R. Ross Reichard, Jessica F. Tranovich, Fadi S. Hanna Al-Shaikh, David S. Knopman, Clifford R. Jack, Dennis W. Dickson, Ronald C. Petersen, Melissa E. Murray

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Introduction: Comparison of tau (flortaucipir) positron emission tomography (FTP-PET) to autopsy is important to demonstrate the relationship of FTP-PET to neuropathologic findings. Methods: Autopsies were performed on 26 participants who had antemortem FTP-PET. FTP-PET standardized uptake value ratios (SUVRs) were compared to autopsy diagnoses and Braak tangle stage. Quantitative tau burden was compared to regional FTP-PET signal. Results: Participants with Braak stages of IV or greater had elevated FTP-PET signal. FTP-PET was elevated in participants with Alzheimer's disease. An FTP-PET SUVR cut point of 1.29 was determined to be optimal. Quantitative measurements of hippocampal and temporal lobe tau burden were highly correlated to FTP-PET signal (rho's from 0.61 to 0.70, P ≤ .02). Discussion: Elevated FTP-PET reflects Braak IV or greater neuropathology. Participants with primary age-related tauopathy and hippocampal sclerosis did not show elevated FTP-PET signal. Secondary neuropathologic diagnoses of Alzheimer's disease neuropathologic change can lead to borderline elevated FTP-PET signal.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAlzheimer's and Dementia
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2019

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Positron-Emission Tomography
Autopsy
Neuropathology
Alzheimer Disease
Tauopathies
Sclerosis
Temporal Lobe

Keywords

  • Alzheimer's disease
  • Autopsy
  • Braak tangle stage
  • flortaucipir
  • PET
  • Tau

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Health Policy
  • Developmental Neuroscience
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

Cite this

Tau-positron emission tomography correlates with neuropathology findings. / Lowe, Val J.; Lundt, Emily S.; Albertson, Sabrina M.; Min, Hoon Ki; Fang, Ping; Przybelski, Scott A.; Senjem, Matthew L.; Schwarz, Christopher G.; Kantarci, Kejal; Boeve, Bradley; Jones, David T.; Reichard, R. Ross; Tranovich, Jessica F.; Hanna Al-Shaikh, Fadi S.; Knopman, David S.; Jack, Clifford R.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Murray, Melissa E.

In: Alzheimer's and Dementia, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lowe, Val J. ; Lundt, Emily S. ; Albertson, Sabrina M. ; Min, Hoon Ki ; Fang, Ping ; Przybelski, Scott A. ; Senjem, Matthew L. ; Schwarz, Christopher G. ; Kantarci, Kejal ; Boeve, Bradley ; Jones, David T. ; Reichard, R. Ross ; Tranovich, Jessica F. ; Hanna Al-Shaikh, Fadi S. ; Knopman, David S. ; Jack, Clifford R. ; Dickson, Dennis W. ; Petersen, Ronald C. ; Murray, Melissa E. / Tau-positron emission tomography correlates with neuropathology findings. In: Alzheimer's and Dementia. 2019.
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AU - Lowe, Val J.

AU - Lundt, Emily S.

AU - Albertson, Sabrina M.

AU - Min, Hoon Ki

AU - Fang, Ping

AU - Przybelski, Scott A.

AU - Senjem, Matthew L.

AU - Schwarz, Christopher G.

AU - Kantarci, Kejal

AU - Boeve, Bradley

AU - Jones, David T.

AU - Reichard, R. Ross

AU - Tranovich, Jessica F.

AU - Hanna Al-Shaikh, Fadi S.

AU - Knopman, David S.

AU - Jack, Clifford R.

AU - Dickson, Dennis W.

AU - Petersen, Ronald C.

AU - Murray, Melissa E.

PY - 2019/1/1

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N2 - Introduction: Comparison of tau (flortaucipir) positron emission tomography (FTP-PET) to autopsy is important to demonstrate the relationship of FTP-PET to neuropathologic findings. Methods: Autopsies were performed on 26 participants who had antemortem FTP-PET. FTP-PET standardized uptake value ratios (SUVRs) were compared to autopsy diagnoses and Braak tangle stage. Quantitative tau burden was compared to regional FTP-PET signal. Results: Participants with Braak stages of IV or greater had elevated FTP-PET signal. FTP-PET was elevated in participants with Alzheimer's disease. An FTP-PET SUVR cut point of 1.29 was determined to be optimal. Quantitative measurements of hippocampal and temporal lobe tau burden were highly correlated to FTP-PET signal (rho's from 0.61 to 0.70, P ≤ .02). Discussion: Elevated FTP-PET reflects Braak IV or greater neuropathology. Participants with primary age-related tauopathy and hippocampal sclerosis did not show elevated FTP-PET signal. Secondary neuropathologic diagnoses of Alzheimer's disease neuropathologic change can lead to borderline elevated FTP-PET signal.

AB - Introduction: Comparison of tau (flortaucipir) positron emission tomography (FTP-PET) to autopsy is important to demonstrate the relationship of FTP-PET to neuropathologic findings. Methods: Autopsies were performed on 26 participants who had antemortem FTP-PET. FTP-PET standardized uptake value ratios (SUVRs) were compared to autopsy diagnoses and Braak tangle stage. Quantitative tau burden was compared to regional FTP-PET signal. Results: Participants with Braak stages of IV or greater had elevated FTP-PET signal. FTP-PET was elevated in participants with Alzheimer's disease. An FTP-PET SUVR cut point of 1.29 was determined to be optimal. Quantitative measurements of hippocampal and temporal lobe tau burden were highly correlated to FTP-PET signal (rho's from 0.61 to 0.70, P ≤ .02). Discussion: Elevated FTP-PET reflects Braak IV or greater neuropathology. Participants with primary age-related tauopathy and hippocampal sclerosis did not show elevated FTP-PET signal. Secondary neuropathologic diagnoses of Alzheimer's disease neuropathologic change can lead to borderline elevated FTP-PET signal.

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