Talc pleurodesis

Rebecca Lindell

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Imaging description Talc pleurodesis is used to manage symptomatic benign and malignant pleural effusions, as well as recurrent pneumothoraces [1, 2]. Talc can be administered via chest tube or by insufflation during thoracoscopy [1]. It works by inciting an inflammatory reaction that results in adherence of the visceral and parietal pleura [2]. CT after talc pleurodesis typically shows high-attenuation areas along the pleura, more often linear than nodular, that are often most prominent in the posterior basal regions [2]. The high-attenuation material may also extend up to the apices, along the mediastinum, or within the fissures [Figures 69.1 and 69.2] [2]. The appearance of talc pleurodesis deposits on CT remains unchanged over time [2, 3]. Patients with residual pleural effusion may demonstrate high-attenuation talc along both the parietal and visceral surfaces around the pleural effusion on CT, giving a variant of the split pleura sign [2]. Talc pleurodesis deposits may show increased FDG uptake on PET, presumably due to secondary pleural inflammation [3, 4]. Importance Correct identification of the CT appearance of talc pleurodesis is important not only for the sake of accuracy, but also because adhesions from a prior talc pleurodesis procedure may complicate or preclude thoracoscopy or lung transplantation [1]. In addition, it is important to not confuse imaging findings of talc pleurodesis with more serious diseases such as empyema or metastases [2–4].

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationPearls and Pitfalls in Thoracic Imaging: Variants and Other Difficult Diagnoses
PublisherCambridge University Press
Pages182-185
Number of pages4
ISBN (Electronic)9780511977701
ISBN (Print)9780521119078
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2011

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Pleurodesis
Talc
Pleura
Thoracoscopy
Pleural Effusion
Malignant Pleural Effusion
Chest Tubes
Insufflation
Empyema
Lung Transplantation
Mediastinum
Pneumothorax
Neoplasm Metastasis
Inflammation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Lindell, R. (2011). Talc pleurodesis. In Pearls and Pitfalls in Thoracic Imaging: Variants and Other Difficult Diagnoses (pp. 182-185). Cambridge University Press. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511977701.070

Talc pleurodesis. / Lindell, Rebecca.

Pearls and Pitfalls in Thoracic Imaging: Variants and Other Difficult Diagnoses. Cambridge University Press, 2011. p. 182-185.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Lindell, R 2011, Talc pleurodesis. in Pearls and Pitfalls in Thoracic Imaging: Variants and Other Difficult Diagnoses. Cambridge University Press, pp. 182-185. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511977701.070
Lindell R. Talc pleurodesis. In Pearls and Pitfalls in Thoracic Imaging: Variants and Other Difficult Diagnoses. Cambridge University Press. 2011. p. 182-185 https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511977701.070
Lindell, Rebecca. / Talc pleurodesis. Pearls and Pitfalls in Thoracic Imaging: Variants and Other Difficult Diagnoses. Cambridge University Press, 2011. pp. 182-185
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