Systemic monocyte and T-cell activation in a patient with human parvovirus B19 infection

A. D. Wagner, J. J. Goronzy, Eric Lawrence Matteson, C. M. Weyand

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Infection with human parvovirus B19 induces a biphasic disease. The initial phase has been associated with viremia. During the second phase of the disease, a spectrum of clinical syndromes can manifest, including erythema infectiosum, perinatal complications, and symmetric arthropathy that resembles rheumatoid arthritis. Although investigators have suspected that some of the second-phase symptoms are related to immune complex formation, the pathogenesis of parvovirus B19-induced clinical manifestations is not understood. Herein we describe a 63-year-old woman with malaise, fever, and symmetric polyarthritis who had IgM antibodies specific for parvovirus B19. Messenger RNA (mRNA) specific for interleukin (IL) 1β, IL 6, and interferon- γ (IFN-γ) was detected by polymerase chain reaction. Transcript concentrations were semiquantified by serial dilution of cells and determination of the minimal number of cells that provided a positive signal. Concentrations of IL 1β and IL 6 mRNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells collected during acute disease were increased by the factor of 32 and 8, respectively. IFN-γ was detected at a 16-fold increased concentration. Two months later, after the patient had experienced complete recovery, production of monokines and IFN-γ was almost normalized. These data raise the possibility that acute parvovirus B19 infection is characterized by a widespread and systemic activation of monocytes, T cells, and natural killer cells. The correlation of increased cytokine mRNA levels and clinical symptoms suggests a potential role of proinflammatory monokines and lymphokines in disease manifestations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)261-265
Number of pages5
JournalMayo Clinic Proceedings
Volume70
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1995

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Human Parvovirus B19
Parvoviridae Infections
Monokines
Interferons
Monocytes
Parvovirus
T-Lymphocytes
Interleukin-1
Messenger RNA
Interleukin-6
Erythema Infectiosum
Joint Diseases
Lymphokines
Viremia
Acute Disease
Antigen-Antibody Complex
Natural Killer Cells
Arthritis
Immunoglobulin M
Blood Cells

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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Systemic monocyte and T-cell activation in a patient with human parvovirus B19 infection. / Wagner, A. D.; Goronzy, J. J.; Matteson, Eric Lawrence; Weyand, C. M.

In: Mayo Clinic Proceedings, Vol. 70, No. 3, 1995, p. 261-265.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wagner, A. D. ; Goronzy, J. J. ; Matteson, Eric Lawrence ; Weyand, C. M. / Systemic monocyte and T-cell activation in a patient with human parvovirus B19 infection. In: Mayo Clinic Proceedings. 1995 ; Vol. 70, No. 3. pp. 261-265.
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