Systematic review: Short-term adverse effects of 5-aminosalicylic acid agents in the treatment of ulcerative colitis

Edward Vincent Loftus, Jr, S. V. Kane, D. Bjorkman

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

144 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aim: To determine whether there is a difference in short-term adverse events in patients with ulcerative colitis treated with mesalazine, olsalazine or balsalazide. Methods: MEDLINE was searched for articles published until 2002. Randomized trials of oral mesalazine, olsalazine or balsalazide for the treatment of active disease or the maintenance of remission were included. Outcomes of interest were the frequencies of patients experiencing adverse events and those withdrawn due to adverse events. Results: Forty-six trials were included. One study of mesalazine vs. sulfasalazine for active colitis showed significantly fewer patients with adverse events with mesalazine. Both balsalazide vs. sulfasalazine studies for active disease showed significantly fewer withdrawals with balsalazide. One trial of balsalazide vs. sulfasalazine for maintenance showed significantly fewer patients with adverse events with balsalazide. Otherwise, no significant differences in safety outcomes were noted. Conclusion: All three 5-aminosalicylic acid agents are safe in the short term. In mesalazine-treated patients, the frequencies of adverse events or withdrawals due to adverse events were comparable with those in placebo-treated patients and lower than those in sulfasalazine-treated patients. Overall, adverse events or withdrawals were not significantly more frequent with olsalazine than with placebo or sulfasalazine. Adverse events and study withdrawals on balsalazide were less frequent than those on sulfasalazine.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)179-189
Number of pages11
JournalAlimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics
Volume19
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 15 2004

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Mesalamine
Sulfasalazine
Ulcerative Colitis
Therapeutics
Placebos
Maintenance
Colitis
balsalazide
MEDLINE
Safety

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics(all)

Cite this

Systematic review : Short-term adverse effects of 5-aminosalicylic acid agents in the treatment of ulcerative colitis. / Loftus, Jr, Edward Vincent; Kane, S. V.; Bjorkman, D.

In: Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Vol. 19, No. 2, 15.01.2004, p. 179-189.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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